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kiwiknitter's picture

Knitting Languages Book

JPaul told me about a wonderful reference book of knitting terms in foreign languages.  I have had need for such a book from time to time as I will occasionally get a pattern from Europe which is not in English.  Recently, I obtained a pattern in French to knit a Becassine doll and I couldn't follow it.

The book "Knitting Lanugages" by Margaret Heathman (2005) is a spiral bound 240 page book.  The dedication is noteworthy:  "This book is dedicated to all knitters who look beyond themselves to the wider world and embrace a universal knitting heritage."  Sounds to me a lot like our MWK community!  The languages translated into English are: Danish, Estonian, French, German, Icelandic, Italian, Japanese, Norwegian, Spanish, Swedish, and then a reverse listing of English into these languages.  I can speak some Italian so I found that section a lot of fun.  I photographed the page with the Swedish terms in honour of our Scandanavian members!

kiwiknitter's picture

ID Tags for Circular Needles

There have been discussions here in the past about methods of storing circular needles.  One of the challenges I find is how to label the sizes so that it's easy to get my hands on the correct size without a lot of hassle. 

I just puchased these little plastic tags from patternworks.com.  The tags fit onto the cable and are labeled in both US and metric.  They slip snugly onto the cable and slide back and forth so in reality one wouldn't need to remove the tag when knitting.  They do not have the needle length on them but that won't be a bother.

They come in 2 different sizes, from 0 - 6 and 7 - 35 US.  The only needles I couldn't tag are the 00 and 000.  Be aware that there are several tags for each size.  I didn't know this and over-ordered.  Not to worry as I'll send the extras to my best friend for his circulars.

Jordan's picture

A Pig

Here's a pig I made last summer.  Ollie will always be the most handsome pig on MWK, but this guy (named "Pig") is royalty in our home.  He's made from an 80-20 cotton-merino blend, which is very soft.  This was a gift for my partner, who fell in love with it in a book we saw at a shop. 

I learned a lot on this, my first "big" project.  Foremost: learn to finish and seam for real before attepting something I intend to wear! 

kiwiknitter's picture

The Perfect Knitter's Gift

I just received this wonderful wee hardcover book called "Knitticisms...and Other Purls of Wisdom".   From the inside dust jacket:  "As anyone who's ever picked up yarn and needles with the intent of learning to knit will tell you, the most important attributes that all new knitters should have in their knitting basket is a sense of humor.  Knitticisms is a fun, light look at the world of knitting featuring purls of knit wit and wisdom.  Along with brilliant color photographs, historical black-and-white images, artwork, vintage pattern booklets and advertising, these words of wisdom make this an amusing presentation of the craft that promises a little something for every knitting enthusiast."

kiwiknitter's picture

Knitting Books for Children

We encourage our 11 year old son to try his hand at many different things so that he can appreciate the variety of life.  He plays on his school soccer and cricket teams, loves movies and music, competes aggressively on the playground and likes to do latch hook rugs and tapestry (children's kits).  He took a brief knitting course for kids during his spring school interval and liked it a lot.  I decided to buy him some knitting books and get him going on another project.  Even if he never learns to love knitting, at least he will know something about it and have an appreciation for the craft.

kiwiknitter's picture

Image for Weekly Forum Topic #6

This is the image that goes with my posting in the Weekly Forum Topic #6.  This is a raglan top-down one-piece sweater for a 6.25" doll.  It is knitted on 1.5mm (US#000) needles with a lace weight merino wool.

kiwiknitter's picture

Soft Wool Holder

I just won this yarn holder on ebay (this photo is from the listing) for my son who loves cats and is just learning to knit.  I bought another in a different pattern for my partner's birthday (he crochets) and I'm using it until I can find some for me.  I like these so much better than the hard plastic and cardboard types.  This sort I can squish up and stuff into my knitting bag when I'm out and about with a project.  The holder is about 6" tall and 4" in diameter with a zippered top and a hole for the wool.

For those who've not used a wool holder, they are nice because they keep the ball under control.  When the ball is almost used up and is lightweight, the holder keeps it weighted down so the wool isn't bouncing around.  I think they're very practical.

kiwiknitter's picture

Boys Don't Knit!

This is a cute story about a young boy and a man knitter who comes to his rescue and saves the day!  I bought it for our 11 year old son who is learning to knit.  The book, last printed in 1990, is a simple story but has a nice way of demolishing the myth that men can't and don't knit.

If you don't have a younster who might benefit from this story, may I suggest that you purchase a copy and donate it to your local primary school library?  Every effort, no matter how small, that we make to bring men back to knitting will be beneficial.

trucker945's picture

DPN's

As you can see in this pic, broken DPN's were salvaged to become VERY short needles to hold 3 or 4 stitches each while knitting the fingers on gloves. These short ones make it much easier to keep an eye from getting poked out, or getting long tips snagged elsewhere on the glove. Keeping them in the M&M candies tube means I don't have to rummage around trying to find them all. Besides, who sez all your needles gotta be the exact same length?

And yes, I did make all of these in the pic. The thin ones vertically on top of the wooden ones are actually pieces of metal coat hanger, clipped to size with pliers and points filed... they make nice US#1 size. Did I mention I'm a cheap S.O.B.?

trucker945's picture

Tools

Some of the Straight needles I have made... pieces of craft store wooden dowels, cut to length, sharpened in a pencil sharpener, sanded smooth, with beads glued on. The smaller diameters on the right started out as bamboo skewers, sanded smooth, with beads glued on. All were rubbed with wax paper for a natural finish. As you can see, the needles on the left have craft store small spools for heads, all the others use beads from thrift store costume jewelry. I have been selling these, and giving them to people whom I have taught basic knitting.

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