What is the difference between inspiration and imitation?

What is the difference between imitation and inspiration? I wonder this as I am currently working on a scarf that I have "designed" in that I took a stitch found in Nicky Epstein’s Knitting on the Edge and put it in a scarf. It is hardly a leap of imagination. Regardless, when I wear this scarf into my LYS and the nice ladies there ask me where I got the pattern, can I say I designed it, or should I say I got it from a Nicky Epstein book?

On a broader level, I have--as I’m sure many of us have--altered a design to better suit my tastes. At what point an altered design become its own design? If I knit a Kathy Zimmerman sweater in green Cascade 220 instead of Classic Elite, have I "designed" a sweater? What if I add an embellishment, or maybe do a garter rib in K4, P2 instead of K2, P2? When does the sweater stop being Kathy Zimmerman’s design?

Billbear's picture

Started my first Cap

Finally started on my first cap.  Using #2s and now thinking for my first one I should have gone for something using bigger needles.  I can tell the stitch is going to look great but as you seasoned people know, it's gonna take me a while to feel like I am getting anywhere. Oh well.

Gabriel's picture

Ooops, I did it again....

Brittney would be so proud! UGH!!!

Anyway....I goofed it was Bill not Billbear that posted the site.. www.knotjustknitting.com Sorry Bill.....and thanks Billbear for bringing it to my attention! It is still an amazing site and especially the "Galleries by Prudence" section.....Wow, cool stuff!

Have a great day guys!!!!

 

Gabriel's picture

Bill is onto something!!!

Oh guys! If you have not yet seen the site that Billbear mentioned a few posts ago.  www.knotjustknitting.com Run, do not walk(type slowly) to that site.....it is unbelievable!!!! A truly inspiring site!!!!

Traditional English Guernsey #1

This is a traditional English Guernsey, knitting in traditional 5-ply wool.  They are knitted on very small needles and produce a water and wind-proof fabric.  The patterns differ from village to village and family to family.  Only the top of the sweaters carry a pattern as the rest in hidden by dungarees.  The arms are usually short so as not to get waterlogged and cause chaffing.  Traditionally the wearers initials are knitted in just about the welt.  They are always knitted in the 'round' and the arms knitted from the shoulder down.

No idea what to call this...

This is described as a wind-cheater in the 1960's pattern book.  It basically the neck part of a sweater to be worn under someting else.  Clever, eh?

Cushion

Not knitted but stitched using up oddments of knitting wool.  Florentine stitch on canvas

Bog-standard Glove

Bog-standard glove knitted in black tweed (Rowan) wool.  Knitted on four needles.

Comfy Zone!

Baggy, soft sweater with patterned welt and collar

Traditional Guernsey #2

This is a traditional English Guernsey, knitting in traditional 5-ply wool.  They are knitted on very small needles and produce a water and wind-proof fabric.  The patterns differ from village to village and family to family.  Only the top of the sweaters carry a pattern as the rest in hidden by dungarees.  The arms are usually short so as not to get waterlogged and cause chaffing.  Traditionally the wearers initials are knitted in just about the welt.  They are always knitted in the 'round' and the arms knitted from the shoulder down.

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