Work is too much

Work has been keeping me so busy that I have not even got a chance to come here and blog or even just come here and look around... It has gotten to the point where I am so tried after work that I do not even feel like knitting.. I know scary.... However they have hired someone else to help take some pressure off.. Which means soon I will be able to knit again... Yeah...

Well Later

kiwiknitter's picture

Eeek! A steek!

Well, actually there are 3 steeks + 5 tubes in this jumper. As many of you know, I’m up-skilling my knitting and I’ve been researching steeks. I finally found enough information to give me the courage to give them a go. I am delighted to report that I was successful. I’ll report my journey with this project for those who are interested in trying steeks and hope I’m not preaching to the choir as I imagine many MWK members already use this method.

My inspiration for this jersey came from a British pattern for a WWI serviceman jersey (see attachment 1). I tried to remain faithful to the original design but needed to make some changes. First and foremost, the pattern was written for a slender 19 year old lad just out of boot camp and I’ve not looked like that (if I ever did) for a long time now. The pattern calls for flat, pieced knitting but I did this jumper in the round and seamless. Other than looking at the original photograph, I did not follow the pattern. Rather, I calculated my size by using the E Zimmermann method found in “The Sweater Workshop” by Jackie Fee. I didn’t plan on the drop sleeves (yuch!) and I’m going to try to eliminate that style on my next jersey.

Okay, so am I CRAZY???

Hello All,

I just registered to the site because I think I'm going crazy ...

I've decided that I am going to "challenge" myself with the Moebius Design. So on that note, I went to my LYS and was talking with the amazing staff ... I bought Cat's first book A treasury of magical knitting, some cheap practice yarn and a LONG circular needle ...

Well ... It's about time to sit down and do some serious figuring out ...

Does anyone have any advice??? I'm thinking a mix of crazy drugs, but I would rather not really go crazy ...

grandcarriage's picture

Top down cardi...

I have some fun yarn, bigger gauge than I normally work, but because it is sort of a felted wool and nylon ribbon, it shouldn't be too warm or heavy. Before I go to the trouble of designing my own pattern, does anyone have a link or pattern for a top down cardigan that is sized for a real man (50" chest +4" for room+ 54" chest)?

Ugh. Not enough time for knitting. I'm taking a class in Marketing and production of apparel, and it is really interesting, but VERY macro.... I just want to do the designing and perhaps manufacturing of the models....Not become Columbia sportswear or a supplier thereof. Sigh.

Best wishes and happy knitting.

grandcarriage's picture

the sock knitter in SF... feel the terror!

Stumped. Need Help...

I'm making a 2x2 ribbed hat. I'm about 2 inches away from starting my decreases. But I don't want swirly, right-leaning decreases. I want the ribs to travel straight up. Please help. Any suggestions?

Thanks, Faust

kylewilliam's picture

Gregg's Blanket

OK so I kind of only pretend to know how to knit - it's OK though because I find that the majority of people are easy to fool - I make up blankets using lots of different yarns, and just knitting (no patterns!) and quit when I think it's long enough - I'm learning SLOWLY - and most recently (after starting to hang out at a cute local yarn shop owned by an 88 year old lady) began my first sweater.

It's fun and I look forward to being more creative (after learning how to read patterns!

This blanket was for my partner - I made it about a year ago... he loves PURPLE!

:)

MMario's picture

"women's work" HAH!

some excerpts from a document on historical knitting:

In England, knitting expanded rapidly in the 15th century, and at the beginning of the 16th, a number of strong Knitters Guilds were formed. A long and difficult apprenticeship was rigorously regulated: it took three years, after which the apprentice, now called a Companion or Journeyman, was to spend another three years working and studying elsewhere. After this six-year period he was admitted to the rank of master artisan upon the completion of:

A rug measuring eight by twelve feet
A shirt or jacket of wool
A pair of wool slippers

All this work had to be executed within thirteen weeks.

The rug had to be of a complex pattern composed of leaves, flowers, and birds, stylized in a conventional fashion and using twenty or thirty colors. This would not be the floor rug we know today, but a tapestry to adorn a wall

and:

It is a curious fact that knitting, in the Middle Ages and even earlier, was a masculine craft, while women spun the yarn

charmingbilly's picture

chatbox icky-ness.

for the larger part, my experiences with the chatbox has been very helpful...especially Mmario! the guy knows so much stuff! anyways, it's kinda sad that a few fellows mistake someone simply being nice with "romantic intentions" when i get time, i'm taking that crack about "i knit to sublimate romantic frustration" out of my profile. i thought i was only being humourous but too many seem to think it is some kind of an invitation. i'd like to think most folks are here for the knitting and the camraderie.

To knot or not to knot

Hi,
I'm currently working on a four panelled throw,(when finished will be 160cm/63" square) which has a stockinette main section with 6cm/2.5" garter stitch borders.
Although it's not really reversible, I don't want to see knots on the back whenever I join in another ball of yarn.

How do others 'join' yarn together seamlessly?
The pattern is from the book simple knits for everyday living by erika knight page 80.
I'll post a photo after I've completed each section.

Rory.

Syndicate content