Attention Lace Knitters!

TheKnittingMill's picture

Hey Guys! It's been quite a while since I've posted. I've been crawling out of the bell jar and it was a long and tough voyage, but it looks like I finally made it! Hope all of you are well and enjoying the holiday season! I need help. I'm about to start a pattern called, "Rose Trellis Shawl" by Catherine Devine with a lace weight alpaca. It begins with a CO hard edge of 110 sts. Which CO do you guys recommend in this case? I've only started shawls with provisional and circular CO's. My favorite and most commonly used is the long tail cast on, but I've heard that even when performed over two needles, it's not the best choice due to lack of stretch and an addition of "bulkiness." What do you guys think? I appreciate your expertise. Thanks!!!

Comments

YugiDean's picture

I hate that bell jar. Now

I hate that bell jar. Now that you're out, smash it so you can't fall back in. :-)

Tom Hart's picture

First of all congratulations

First of all congratulations on your escape from the bell jar. That’s an enormous accomplishment. I hope you never get trapped there again. I can’t imagine clawing my way back from something like that. May you enjoy ease of well-being all your days. As far as the cast on goes, I’m new and don’t know squat but because I knew how to crochet before I learned to knit I’ve been trying the crocheted cast on lately. I like the well defined edge that the crocheted cast on gives. (And I think a knitted cast on gives the same effect.) If you know your way around a crochet hook, give it a try and see if it’s what you’re looking for. All the best, Tom

Joe-in Wyoming's picture

Good point, Tom. I've been

Good point, Tom. I've been using the crochet cast on for the top down raglan cardigans I recently designed, mainly for the ease of working up stitches for the collar/button band. -- Books, knitting, cats, fountain pens...Life is Good.

Kerry's picture

Good to see you back. I

Good to see you back. I can't offer any better advice than has already been given.

Joe-in Wyoming's picture

It's great to see you back.

It's great to see you back. We've missed your smiling face. I think the cable cast on is a good place to start for this one. If you need a slightly firmer edge you can always tink back (if you've knit a few stitches) and/or knit through the back loops to tighten it up. Looking forward to pictures. Take care - Joe -- Books, knitting, cats, fountain pens...Life is Good.

grandcarriage's picture

I'd do provisional cast

I'd do provisional cast on... when you pull it off, if you want a firmer edge you can do a bit of tubular cast off method across the loops to firm it up, still very stretchy.

Nice to see you back. I totally understand the Bell jar bit.

TheKnittingMill's picture

Thanks Bob! Great advice!

Thanks Bob! Great advice! I feel so stupid now not thinking of it. I told tallguy (who pm'd me with the same suggestion) that sometimes you just really are too close to the project!

“If some sissy...tried to kick my ass I would say hey, Mary, go knit me a sweater before I slap you in the face!” --Eric Cartman, South Park

Happy Holidays!
Mill

PieintheSky88's picture

Personally I prefer the long

Personally I prefer the long tail cast on. I don't find it affects my stretch much, I would say just be wary of your tension =) Best of luck!

*All an actor has is their blind faith that they are who they say they are today in any scene.*
~Meryl Streep

TomH's picture

I use the long tail cast on.

I use the long tail cast on. Since I cast on quite loosely, it's never been a problem for me. You could always cast on using a needle that a size or two larger than the needles you'll knit with - if you tend to cast on tightly.

scottly's picture

Ditto to that. I sometimes

Ditto to that. I sometimes cast on to a needle almost twice the size I'm going to knit the lace with.

MMario's picture

I usually do one of the two

I usually do one of the two options below:

A) Cable cast on

B) Provisional cast on w/ waste yarn (leaving a long enough tail to go back later and cast off.....

Though Given my laziness - I would say 98 % of the time it is "A" - which I find stretchy enough for my needs....but I also do not tend to block "hard"

If I need REALLY stretchy - then I just use a backwards 'e' cast on - though they are hard to work evenly.....

MMario

AndrewNiehus's picture

I know this is a really dumb

I know this is a really dumb question, but I looked up Cable cast on and this video came up.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e4p6ybqnvVc
I understand how to do the cast on, but the very first stitch she does, does it have a name. I have always cast on just by knitting the stitch, pulling it through and putting it on the needle. I have never needed anything else.

MMario's picture

The first stitch of a cable

The first stitch of a cable cast-on (aside from the slip knot) is a knit on...

because for the cabled cast on you insert the needle between the last two stitches and knit on a stitch; however, there aren't two stitches yet, so you have to do one regular knit on stitch.

but for a regular knit on cast on you just insert into the last stitch and knit a stitch .

TheKnittingMill's picture

Thanks for the info Mario! I

Thanks for the info Mario! I thought about the backwards "e" cast on too after doing a little research, but in my limited use of it I had the same problems you mentioned and wouldn't want to deal with the hassle for the first row of 110 stitches! I kept seeing the "lace" cast on (which I had never heard of), but eventually realized it was another name for the knit CO. Have you ever tried the Estonian cast on?

“If some sissy...tried to kick my ass I would say hey, Mary, go knit me a sweater before I slap you in the face!” --Eric Cartman, South Park

Happy Holidays!
Mill