The fine gauge sweater vest asks for your advice

WillyG's picture

Okay, I'm panicking a little...I got some alpaca to knit my dad a v-neck vest. The yarn info says it's sport weight. Well, a US 3 needle seems to make too loose a fabric! Sure, Dad doesn't really like the handknit look, so the fine gauge would appeal to him, but that. would. take. so. long. AAAAHHH! Not only that, but I feel like the fine gauge would make for a rather different approach than the worsted weight I've done my couple of sweaters in. Maybe I'm wrong. But, for instance, the short rows to provide some shaping would have to be adjusted/increased. Help!
Can I get away with doubling this yarn? This scares me for the warmth factor and yardage. I have about 1900 yards to work with. Dad's chest is about 45", plus he's got a fair paunch, so I was going to add some short rows in the front to compensate, in addition to the short rows in back to raise the back of the sweater a bit. (Or are the short rows to raise the back unnecessary in a vest if you split the top into front and back anyway?)

Comments

grandcarriage's picture

A fine alpaca knit double

A fine alpaca knit double with Noro kureyon sock weight LOOKS AMAZING! There is obscene yardage on the Noro sock, so it's not too bad $$$. I'd personally recommend using the earthtones or blue-black-grey-green colourway.

WillyG's picture

I did a swatch in size 7

I did a swatch in size 7 needles, holding the alpaca with a variegated wool/bamboo/nylon sock yarn, and I am kinda intrigued by the way it creates a much more unique fabric than the alpaca alone (not to mention the more familiar gauge). It also seems to answer my fear of it being too hot. I just gotta get more of the sock yarn. I still have time to play around, though.

Joe-in Wyoming's picture

That's great. Looking

That's great. Looking forward to updates and photos. -- Books, knitting, cats, fountain pens...Life is Good.

New York Built's picture

You have lots of

You have lots of options:
Make increases at the side seams;
Leave the bottom side seams open and finished as a vent;
Put in a couple of short rows in the front. They will act separately from the ones put in the back to increase the length of the back;
Don't use any ribbing at the bottom, or don't decrease the number of stitches by much when you make it.

WillyG's picture

Hey, thanks...that helps!

Hey, thanks...that helps!

Joe-in Wyoming's picture

What they said. I am not

What they said. I am not very skilled at sweaters but increasing your yarn weight can sure help. -- Books, knitting, cats, fountain pens...Life is Good.

New York Built's picture

Hey, this fellow did all the

Hey, this fellow did all the heavy lifting for ya!

Purly Man's Words Of Wisdom

Get back to knitting!

WillyG's picture

Yeah, I'm familiar with the

Yeah, I'm familiar with the concept...I actually just took a class with Jared Flood this fall regarding this. He mentioned doing three sets of short rows in the back to raise the back of the neck. When I mentioned the paunch, he thought two sets of short rows in front would make sense...I'm just wondering if doing them on front might cancel them out, and if I'd have to do more short rows on a finer gauge to achieve a similar shaping.

Bill's picture

perhaps you could double it

perhaps you could double it with a less expensive fibre...or a lace weight...I knit with multiple strands all the time...gives me a more interesting colour...

WillyG's picture

Thanks, I hadn't thought of

Thanks, I hadn't thought of that...the possibilities are starting to explode now...