Kilt Patterns

steveluzz's picture

My next item to learn is a Kilt. Does anyone have a good resource for a wool kilt?

Comments

drmel94's picture

Knit fabrics will tend to

Knit fabrics will tend to stretch far too much to make them a viable option to use for a kilt, particularly in something like llama which doesn't have any elasticity to help it keep its shape. You're far better off using the llama for some nice kilt hose (with garters to make sure they stay up) and spending the money either to have a kilt made or to buy the tartan to make your own.

For my wedding, I had a box-pleated kilt (Baird tartan - great-grandmother's family name) made by Matt Newsome in North Carolina. The box-pleated kilt is an older style than the knife-pleated kilts of the Victorian era and uses about half the fabric. He's also co-written an addendum to "The Art of Kiltmaking" with instructions for the box-pleated style, so I'll be using the book and addendum to make my next kilt. Just as soon as I can afford the tartan.

Incidentally, Newsome maintains that the box-pleated kilt is a more balanced garment, since the fabric is split about 50:50 between front and back, rather than 75% of the fabric in the rear as in the knife-pleated kilts. I love mine but don't wear it nearly often enough. It's what I'll be wearing to Rhinebeck, though.

"Hatred does not end by hatred; hatred ends by love. This is the eternal law." - Buddha

EricJT's picture

http://www.thefrugalcorner.co

http://www.thefrugalcorner.com/ has fabric but I think its not wool. Wool tartan fabric is very expensive.

"Knitting your brows won't knit you a hat."

paulhenry's picture

Woollen tartan is expensive,

Woollen tartan is expensive, but it's a quality cloth, so I generally think if I am going to be spending a lot of time working on a project I should at least start with good materials.
I'm afraid to say that FC kilts are cheap andgenerally look it !

http://www.paulhenrydesign.com

paulhenry's picture

I make kilts, and would be

I make kilts, and would be very happy to talk you through how to go about it, there are lots of ways, but the truth is, the kilt is a long length of fabric , pleated and secured, so there are many different ways of making them, there is also such a lot of myth attached to them as well, I'm sure we could have fun talking about them, I'm up for a chat whenever you like!!

http://www.paulhenrydesign.com

HuskerChub's picture

Folkware has a good

Folkware has a good pattern/guideline it can be found at http://www.folkwear.com/oldeurope.html #152. There is also a book "The Art of Kiltmaking" at http://www.celticdragonpress.com/.

Mnjack's picture

Yes, it is a rather

Yes, it is a rather frightening web site, but good for a laugh. They could have used a hunk to pose, that may have helped. Thanks for the chuckle.

Bill's picture

proper wool kilts are

proper wool kilts are expensive...$600. or more.
...you want a heavy wool...lighter weight woolens are cheaper but look it.
...they don't move well...and they wrinkle easily.
There are many good sources on line...best come from Scotland even though they may be orderd from a shop in the US.
...there is a kilt museum on the east coast where the curator makes kilts...I'll try to find the link.
Be sure you measure properly. The bottom edge of the kilt should just touch the floor when you kneel down. Long or short kilts are not correct...especially mini-kilts...LOL

I wear mine fairly often...which is why I knit kilt socks...

steveluzz's picture

I have about 100 hanks of

I have about 100 hanks of homespun llama wool that I am just itching to make a kilt out of. Thank you so much for your reply. What gauge needle would you suggest? A size 6 would give a nice tight stich.

EricJT's picture

You want to knit a kilt?! If

You want to knit a kilt?! If you do, it may be the only knitted on on the planet. They're all made of woven fabric with fine yarns, like wool flannel without the brushed surface. If your yarn is fine enough you would probably use a size zero needle. If you really want a kilt, make one from woven fabric. I make mine from jeans.

"Knitting your brows won't knit you a hat."

MMario's picture

The bottom edge of the kilt

The bottom edge of the kilt should just touch the floor when you kneel down. Long or short kilts are not correct

The auld sayin' goes:
Above the knee 's a boy
At the knees - a man
Below the knees.......

naught but a bleedin' braggart!

fuzzed's picture

The bottom edge of the kilt

The bottom edge of the kilt should just touch the floor when you kneel down. Long or short kilts are not correct...especially mini-kilts...LOL

I've seen photos online of some men who wear what I'll call a "kilt-strap"... basically a jockstrap with a small bit of pleated plaid fabric in the front. It's kinda funny, and I thought I'd be a smartass and post a pic if I could find one. But then I found something else...

This website not only proves your point, but frightens me quite a bit... http://www.skortman.com/kiltpage1.htm

EricJT's picture

I wouldn't call that a kilt.

I wouldn't call that a kilt. I can't imagine trying to keep your junk covered in something that short. I'm with Queen Victoria, who set the kilt length at mid-kneecap. Anything shorter looks either tacky or girly. Or like you couldn't afford a kilt that fit you right.

"Knitting your brows won't knit you a hat."

cashmere knight's picture

That guy can't be serious

That guy can't be serious about selling any of that, can he?

"Imagination is more important than knowledge. For knowledge is limited, whereas imagination embraces the entire world, stimulating progress, giving birth to evolution." --Albert Einstein

albert's picture

Cripes- now I'm emotionally

Cripes- now I'm emotionally scarred for life!

Bill's picture

Truely frightening! ...and

Truely frightening!
...and not even camo can make it butch!!!
LOL