Question - squares with "live" stitches

purlyman's picture

So I've finished off the 20 squares for my "Barn Raising" Baby Blanket and am about to start weaving them together with kitchener stitch. My question is... each square has four sides of "live" stitches with a tail left at one corner. What do I do with this tail? Can I somehow join it to the adjacent side? Tie it off? Weave it in along with the kitchener stitching as I come to them?

Thanks!

Comments

albert's picture

Possibly you can use the

Possibly you can use the Cowichan three-needle bindoff- on the right side it presents a lower profile than the normal TNB, on the wrong side it looks like stockinette. It is described in the new edition of Knitting in the Old Way by Pricilla Gibson-Roberts.

RickeScott's picture

I'd use the Kirchner stitch

I'd use the Kirchner stitch using the tails as far as they go, then use new yarn to finish if necessary.

Tallguy's picture

Grafting is the better way

Grafting is the better way to join the squares since it gives a much nicer finish. But in the usual grafting that we do, we always leave a long enough tail which is to be used for joining the two live stitches together. If your tails are not long enough, you could do as many stitches as you can, and join in a new piece of yarn. Those final last bits of tails have to woven in somehow to hide them, and that is a separate job from grafting.

purlyman's picture

Is grafting different/better

Is grafting different/better than kitchener stitch?

Tallguy's picture

Kitchener stitch... a.k.a.

Kitchener stitch... a.k.a. grafting. Used to graft together live stitches to make an invisible seam that looks like a continuous row of stockinette stitch. Grafting is the accepted term for joining all types of stitches, Kitchener being relegated to the tops of toes on socks only.

Bill's picture

Kitchener stitch...I often

Kitchener stitch...I often use it to connect the two ends of a "smoke ring" scarf...

purlyman's picture

tops of toes on socks only?

tops of toes on socks only?

mrossnyc's picture

After looking through

After looking through several of my reference books, Kitchener stitch and grafting are basically the same thing. The only slight difference I found was that one book referred to grafting as the method used to join to pieces together with finished edges. It still creates a seamless look on the right side.

If you do the three needle bind off with the right sides facing, you will be creating a small ridge on the back side of the afghan. If it matters, this will also create a slightly sturdier seam, than grafting/kitchener stitch.

Either way, you might find it easier to connect your panels into long strips and then join the strips together on the long side. It might help you use up your tails and prevent creating more ends to weave in when your ends run out and you have to join another piece of yarn.

Hope that helps.

RickeScott's picture

I've also learned that a

I've also learned that a 3-needle bind-off next to a garter stitch ridge row really helps disguise the seam.

purlyman's picture

I have, but the kitchener is

I have, but the kitchener is much cleaner. I love the two needle bind-off but I don't like it when both sides are going to be seen.

Bill's picture

have you thought about

have you thought about putting them together with a two needle bind-off?

albert's picture

What is a two needle

What is a two needle bind-off, and also what is the difference between grafting and kichener stitch?

purlyman's picture

I'm not sure what the

I'm not sure what the difference between grafting and kichener is, but I think what we're talking about is actually the "three" needle bind-off. :-)