Short rows

albert's picture

When using short rows I end up with small holes at the point where I wrap and turn. These holes almost look like yarn over holes. Is there any way to do short rows without these little holes?

Comments

rjcb3's picture

Here's a video where it

Here's a video where it shows how to do short row heels -- no wrap and turn...

...AND NO HOLES!!!

...of course, if you're doing short rows for anything else, I'm sure that it would work just the same.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zu5YAKsAEpY

Pretty much all you need to do is knit to your turning point, and then turn...don't wrap, then slip the first stitch and purl back to your next turning point, and then turn, slip, and knit, etc. etc. etc. and when you're ready to make your heel, you knit up to the gap left behind and then knit those two together and then make a stitch (and knit it, of course) turn, and slip that new made stitch and purl back to the next gap, purl those two together, and make a new stitch, purl it, turn, slip, knit to the gap -- so on and so forth...

)O(
Robert

Thomasknits's picture

Would double wrapping work?

Would double wrapping work? You wrap it like you normally would, when the rows are getting shorter. Then when you are picking back up the wrapped stitches...When you get to the first wrapped stitch, you knit it together with the wrap, then wrap the NEXT stitch again. When you come to that stitch you knit it together with BOTH wraps and then wrap the next stitch again...continuing across. That's what I do with my toe-up socks at least.
-Thomas

crmartin's picture

Check out this link for a

Check out this link for a demonstration of wrap & turn .

Randy

QueerJoe's picture

In addition to wrapping the

In addition to wrapping the stitch and knitting the wrap with the stitch, I also find it makes an easier, less holey transition if after you wrap the stitch, you slip the first stitch on your way back.

So if I wanted to do a short row where I'd knit 5 and then turn, the instructions would be something like this:

K5, Sl1, yarn forward, SL1 back to left needle, yarn back and turn.
SL1, K4.

Then on the row that goes to the end of the short-rows, I would K5 and then knit the wrap with the 6th stitch.

Like the other guys have mentioned, it still shows, but shows a lot less.

MMario's picture

Neat idea! will have to try

Neat idea! will have to try it.

albert's picture

Thanks, guys, I'll try your

Thanks, guys, I'll try your suggestions.

Crafty Andy's picture

Visit Crafty Andy's Blog

Visit Crafty Andy's Blog There are always holes, but you can minimize it this way. Slip the stitch, wrap it, slip back the same stitch you wrapped, then when you start going back you slip the first stich again till the end. When you are in the row where you knit all the stitches, you pick up the appropriate wrap and knit it the two of them together through the back loop, this will twist the stitch and make it a bit tighter. I will have a video in a day or two about this if you don't get it know maybe you will get it later with the video, but no guarantees lol!

murfpapa's picture

I've only done one project

I've only done one project with short rows and I had the same problem until I saw the directions said to pick up the wrap with the associated stitch and knit them as one. It's almost like doing a k2tog only instead of having 2 separate stitches to be knit, there is the original stitch and the wrap around it, like the k2 part is already together. Does that make any sense? Instead of the k2 part being 2 stitches right next to each other, they are occupying the same position already.

steve kadel's picture

you may be wrapping to tight

you may be wrapping to tight and pulling the groups of threads together ,aking the hole

albert's picture

I've always been wrapped a

I've always been wrapped a little too tight.