My new favorite hat pattern

scottly's picture

It's called an Irish hiking hat. I love making it and it's incredibly warm and comfortable. It looks just as good on a guy as a girl of course depending on the color. These two are both comission pieces, I've made two others that were snaped up. The black on is in Cascade 220 black tweed and the other one is in Noro Silk Garden and the color number escapes me. Using Noro for hats is another recent discovery - what fun. I think I'm addicted.

Because you knit the band first on straight needles and then pick up the stitches with circular needles to make the crown, making the exact size is really easy. The band is also doubled over so it's extra warm on the ears and forehead.

Sorry the pictures sucks. I need a head form to photograph hats. The pointy top rounds out when worn.

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Comments

Joe-in Wyoming's picture

Hi - Great pattern. I found

Hi - Great pattern. I found one similar in a magazine about 25 years ago, listed as an "Aran cap". (Can't remember what magazine, though...McCall's maybe.) I knit it up for a friend of mine and she loved it. I thought then that it would make a great man's cap but never pursued the idea. It didn't use a doubled band, that I remember. Also, Thompson's book on ganseys and such has a similar pattern from the Aran Islands that one reviewer mistook for a teapot cosy! LOL Nice to see a renewed interest in a wonderful pattern, now that more men are willing to wear something other than the ubiquitous watchcap. (Unlike 25 years ago, for the most part.) Thank goodness I always wore whatever I felt like, which was pretty daring in 1970s to '90s Wyoming. Hmmm...maybe even now-come to think of it. Books, knitting, cats...Life is Good.

NewfieKnitter's picture

I think I have a new

I think I have a new favorite hat pattern... so many hats come to mind with never enough time... thanks for the link...

scottly's picture

Here's the link to download

Here's the link to download pattern as a PDF for anyone who's interested.

http://learningmywaythrough.files.wordpress.com/2007/11/irish-hiking-hatworsted2.pdf

For those of you who don't know, just copy the link a above and paste it in your browser.

potterdc's picture

Wow, I'm sold! The best

Wow, I'm sold! The best beloved wants a hat of his own and picked out yarn last week for me to use - I think I'll try this pattern!

Jonathan in DC

Think less, enjoy it more.

mrossnyc's picture

These hats look great! I

These hats look great! I really like the cabled band, it's a nice variation on typical hats.

teejtc's picture

I love 'em... what a great

I love 'em... what a great idea!

Do I understand correctly that the band is double thickness (folded over)? Do you think it'd work to simply pick up the stitches for the "body" of the hat through both layers instead of having to connect them with the kitchener (or did you try that and find that it didn't work?)

Grace and Peace,
`tim

scottly's picture

The grafting was only to

The grafting was only to connect the two ends of the hat band. It's created as a strip on straight needles. Once you've connected the ends and it becomes a circular band you fold it horizontally and pick up the stitches through both layers (like you said) with a crochet hook and slip them on to circular needles.

teejtc's picture

ahh... sorry, I

ahh... sorry, I misunderstood.

Either way -- the hats are gorgeous!

Grace and Peace,
`tim

QueerJoe's picture

I love the whole concept of

I love the whole concept of this hat...it would be easy to do any kind of band at the bottom using any technique, like intarsia, or Fair Isle...or obviously cables.

This gives me some great ideas...thanks.

scottly's picture

That was my thought as well

That was my thought as well - there are all kinds of fun things you could do with the band both with color and pattern.

albert's picture

Love them both- ship 'em!

Love them both- ship 'em! How do you join the headband to itself?

scottly's picture

Thanks Albert. I don't bind

Thanks Albert. I don't bind off at the end and pick up the stitches at the bottom and graft them using the Kirchner stitch. It's a little time consuming but the results are worth it.