Can I Cry Now?

rickrat's picture

I had finally finished up all my Christmas projects and decided to concentrate on my sock knitting. I made it through the foot and the heel with few problems (I'm doing toe-up), but I always seem to mess up the tops. I have one that is sitting in a corner waiting for me to track down a dropped stitch. I am using a nice (ie inexpensive) sock yarn, a BLACK sock yarn, a teeny, tiny black sock yarn. I can only see the darn stitches at high noon on bright sunny days! Such days have been few are far apart recently. I put that on hold and started another set, this time with a nice wool/silk worsted weight yarn. I got all the way through and then totally screwed up binding off (the finished edge doesn't have anywhere near enough give). Can you say unhappy puppy? All sock paraphernalia have been banished to the bottom of my stash pile for now. I am not liking socks and socks are not liking me! Grrrrr!
On the bright side, I just got "The Crochet Dude's Designs For Guys" as a Christmas gift and I think I'm gonna go back to easy stuff, like sweaters. I may try some lace projects also. My first attempts at lace-work (is that an actual phrase?) were much more productive than sock-work.

Comments

drmel94's picture

Another stretchy cast-off

Another stretchy cast-off method is in this post by Grumperina. I've used it a couple of times and like it well enough. Personally, though, I find myself most often doing EZ's "casting on casting off" or sewn cast off. It gives a nice stretchy edge, it's relatively easy to do, and it looks like a long tail cast-on. A visual tutorial (along with a few other methods) can be found at this post on Knitty.

"Hatred does not end by hatred; hatred ends by love. This is the eternal law." - Buddha

Britisher's picture

oh dear, tiny black sock

oh dear, tiny black sock yarn is very challenging, as my current project shows. Probably not the best yarn to use in winter.

As for binding off, I wonder whether a Kitchener bind off and give you the stretchy finish needed for socks?. I blogged about the Kitchener bind off a few weeks ago. It certainly takes practice, but does produce a beautiful finish that is well worth the effort.