Sewing Seams Question

Thinman's picture

I'm at the point on my cardiagan where I'm sewing the side seams together - the long seams from the wrist to the waist. How long should the pieces of yarn be that I use for sewing? I managed to use one long piece to attach the sleeves, but I don't think I could keep one long enough to do the whole side seam untangled. Is there a standard length? On a side note, this is the first time I've used the mattress stitch and I LOVE it!

Comments

grandcarriage's picture

I'm kind of particular about

I'm kind of particular about seams: some things to note: some body yarns are not strong enough to sew the seams with..give it a "pull test" before you sew with it. Seam with smooth yarns.. if you have to pull it out to redo, you want that process as easy as possible). On a short seam, (such a kitchenering a shoulder) the tradition is to take THRICE the length of the eventual seam. On a long seam, you are far better to take no longer than an arm length, tops, as it gets too unwieldy to use longer AND as queerjoe mentioned, it wears/weakens the sewing yarn to be pulled through the fabric too much. I personally will twist the yarn a couple of extra times in the direction of spin or ply to firm it up a little after each dozen stitches (don't do this if the sewing yarn wraps up on itself).

I think its far better to use several shorter lengths of yarn than one long length: It's easy to hide ends in the seaming when you end or start a new length.

QueerJoe's picture

Personally, I use one long

Personally, I use one long strand of yarn for the length of the side seam (and I agree, the mattress stitch is like the magic invisible seam option).

Sometimes the constant pulling through of the yarn weakens or breaks it, and I have to start another length. Sometimes, the section of double yarn on either side of the needle eye will tangle with some much activity and if the knot is too difficult to fix, I start another length. I also let the darning needle dangle to untwist the yarn.

Can't wait to see pictures.