Gauge for circular knitting

Jordan's picture

Here's a link (to a forum entry on knittinghelp.com) that talks about making gauge swatches for projects knit in-the-round. 

The method described involves knitting a row, sliding the work to the other end of a circular needle, then knitting the next row from the same side (leaving a long loop of yarn across the back).  Advantage: you end up with a measurable rectangle instead of a loop. 

Has anyone tried this method?  Are there other methods to recommend?

(I'm starting my first hat.  It's very exciting!)

Thanks--
Jordan 

Jordan's picture

A follow-up: I tried this

A follow-up: I tried this method of making a gauge swatch.  I learned that I needed to make it wider than I otherwise would have.  The fact that I was essentially attaching a new strand of yarn every single row (and the fact that I don't know how to do that very well!) made the first and last inch of each row much looser than the middle.  It was hard to read the gauge from that swatch. 

Just like to suggest keeping

Just like to suggest keeping a yarn log in the old knitting notebook. I have saved many an hour knitting swatches -- both in the round and flat -- because I had notes on the yarn from a previous project.

Jordan's picture

Hey--that's really smart. 

Hey--that's really smart.  I'm definitely going to start doing that.  Thanks for the tip!

ChazH's picture

Hi Jordan, I've not done

Hi Jordan, I've not done this specific method before and but I do find it very helpful to make my swatch on a circular needle if that's how I'll be making the piece. My knitting tends to be a bit more relaxed on circular needles (not sure why).  This method sounds interesting. I'll try it.

Probably, your purl stitch

Probably, your purl stitch is tighter than your knit stitch. That is not at all uncommon and is one of the reasons many knitters prefer to knit in the round instead of back-and-forth.

A project or two done in ribbing may help even out the tendency to purl tighter. Mostly, the more purling that a knitter does, the more closely the purl and knit stitches get in tension. In other words, the tendency to purl tightly seems to be because most knitters learn to knit before learning to purl. And most knitters aren't as comfortable with purl as with knit.