Front & Back of stitch???????

scottly's picture

This is one of the things that completly confuses me when trying to learn a new stitch. When the directions say front or back of stitch what do they mean? To me a stitch has a left and a right. Sometimes I can figure it out by the diagram but mostly I just avoid patterns with stitches that I don't know. If there were an anatomy of a stitch diagram maybe I could figure this stuff out. Right now I'm stuck on SSK. Help!

Scott

RareSteek's picture

Where I get confused with

Where I get confused with ssk is that sometimes (or am I just making this up after some hallucination?) some patterns seem to want you to slip as if to purl, slip as if to purl, then "Insert your left needle parallel and in front of the right needle etc." as mario wrote above. How do you know which it is??? slip as if to purl or slip as if to knit??

MMario's picture

There are actually three

There are actually three ssk's floating about the internet. I have seen instructions for:

a) slip as to knit, slip as to knit, insert left needle and knit together

b) slip as to knit, slip as to purl, insert left needle and knit together

C)slip as to purl, slip as to purl, insert left needle and knit together.

I'd say the first is most common, the second is suppossed to lie a bit flatter, and the third I've only run across once or twice.

Personally, I either just use k2tog through back loop or skp.

MMario - ambiguity is cultivated, it doesn't happen in a vacuum!

scottly's picture

This sort of begs another

This sort of begs another question. The project I'm working on is a watch cap constructed bottom up. When decreasing stitches in the crown of a cap how could it possibly matter if its a right or left decrease? Wouldn't k2tog be just as effective as SSK?

MMario's picture

decreases "lean" in

decreases "lean" in different directions - and effect the look of your fabric - k2tog is a right leaning decrease, ssk is a left leaning decrease, so yes, it can definately effect the result. HOw much so depends on the placement of your decreases and what the surrounding fabric consisits of.

MMario - ambiguity is cultivated, it doesn't happen in a vacuum!

scottly's picture

OK, so for lack of a better

OK, so for lack of a better word say you stacked the decreases basically one a top the other, wouldn't the only difference between decreasing with k2tog or SSK be the direction of the swirl at the top of the crown? Wouldn't one just swirl to the rignt and the other to the left?

MMario's picture

it also depends on where the

it also depends on where the "eaten" stitch comes from:

for some bad text examples:

xxx/xxx/xxx/xxx/xxx/xxx
xxx/xx/xx/xx/xx/xx
xxx/x/x/x/x/x

OR:
xxx/xxx/xxx/xxx/xxx/xxx
xx/xx/xx/xx/xx/xxx
x/x/x/x/x/x/xxx

OR:
xxx\xxx\xxx\xxx\xxx
xxx\xx\xx\xx\xx\xx
xxx\x\x\x\x\x

Or:

xxx\xxx\xxx\xxx\xxx
xx\xx\xx\xx\xxx
x\x\x\x\xxx

MMario - ambiguity is cultivated, it doesn't happen in a vacuum!

BuduR's picture

Unless the pattern tells me

Unless the pattern tells me to do otherwise I always use version A.
MWK's Token Estrogen-American

scottly's picture

OMG, I think I get it. Part

OMG, I think I get it. Part of the problem is that I really didn't know if I was knitting English or Continental - these are actually new phrases to me. So between your explanations and the Continental example of SSK video I think I have it (I'm left handed knitting Continental by the way). I'm at work without my knitting - darn it - but as soon as I get home I'm going to try it out.

Thanks guys

Scott

QueerJoe's picture

Typically the instruction

Typically the instruction would say "K into the front and back of the next stitch" or something like that.

The front or back means which way your right-hand needle should enter into the stitch (if it's in front of the right leg of the stitch and behind the left leg, it's through the front of the stitch, if it's behind the right leg of the next stitch and in front of the left leg, it's through the back).

SSK means - with your yarn in back, slip the next two stitches as if you were going to knit them, and then insert the LEFT-hand needle into the two slipped stitches, in front of the right-hand needle, and then knit the two stitches together.

Here is a page of videos that will show you what I tried to write.

http://www.knittinghelp.com/videos/decreases

Good luck, and let us know how it turns out.

MMario's picture

BTW - Knittinghelp.com has

BTW - Knittinghelp.com has some great videos availiable ; both continental and English; on how to form various increases, decreases, etc.

MMario - ambiguity is cultivated, it doesn't happen in a vacuum!

MMario's picture

well now, had the oppisete

well now, had the oppisete problem - people kept telling me about the "left leg" and the "right leg" of a stitch - and to me they had a front and a back.

Assuming you use one of the more common knitting methods; then your stitches waiting to be worked should be on your left needle - with an orientation that puts one leg of each stitch forward and to the right of the other leg, which is tto the left and BEHIND the needle (thus, the back of the stitch.

For slip,slip,knit:

slip the 1st stitch to the right needle as if you were going to knit. Slip the 2nd stitch ditto. This changes the orientation of the stitches. the right leg of each of the slipped stiches in now BEHIND the needles, rather then in front.

Insert you left needle parallel and in front of the right needle through those two stitches you slipped. wrap the yarn around the right needle and draw it through the stitches.

MMario - ambiguity is cultivated, it doesn't happen in a vacuum!

Expertly and clearly put -

Expertly and clearly put - as usual.