messenger bag questions

vettechadam's picture

I fly frequently and have not been able to find a carryon that fit TSA guidelines and carried what I needed so I decided to make my own. I have the front bottom, back and flap done in one five foot piece but I am starting the sides which will also act as the strap.
What is going to be my best way to connect it.
1. sew them together
2. is there a way to knit it to the other piece as I go?

has anyone else came across this and how well does the seam hold together once it is felted?

love to hear your advise

Comments

kylewilliam's picture

it might be too late, but on

it might be too late, but on knitty.com there's a felted bag pattern that is designed by knitting the base first, then picking up the stitches around the perimeter of the base (you would already have knittied the long side, then without turning, you pick up the short end, then the other long side and lastly the second short end)

THEN you are knitting in the round (it's all knit which makes it EASY - and with marker you know where the "end" is - once your bag is the right length, you knit between your two markers to make the flap - voila! it's already "sewn" up - you then have to knit your pockets and strap and off you go -

The one bag I have actually felted so far I went ahead and attached the pocket (kind of sewed it on) and when it was felted it is hard to tell that it was sewn on - it's VERY sturdy. you might want to knit a swatch and try sewing a pocket onto it then felt it as an experiment just to see what it's like - definately practice the felting process before throwing your bag in the washer!

If I were to sew up the sides of a bag, I'd probably just start sewing - if you're using the same color yarn it's not even going to matter how "neat" you are because it all felts together and becomes blended :)

good luck :)

Kyle

www.kyleknits.blogspot.com

If you slipped the first

If you slipped the first stitch of every row you'll have no problem picking up those live stitches and just knitting the sides - picking up those edge stitches at the beginning and end of each row. If you didn't slip those stitches, you may have a time trying to pick them up but it *is* doable given enough scotch and adult language . . .

~Mike in Tampa
Yahoo Id: stickywarp2001

Imagination is Everything.
It is the preview of Life's coming attractions.

drmel94's picture

Well, sewing seams might be

Well, sewing seams might be the quickest way to go, as it won't matter too much once it's felted, but just for the learning experience, you might try picking up stitches around the front/bottom/back where the strap will be attached and then knit the strap directly on. The technique is used in saddle shoulder sweaters and sometimes in attaching edging to lace. There's a basic explanation of the technique (with less than spectacular photos, but it's still fairly easy to figure out) on Wendy Johnson's blog here.