The shape of shawls to come...

MMario's picture

This is a duplicate of a project I was working on on another forum. I have added some items and changed some others - so it isn't just copy and paste.

I thought I'd I'd put down somewhere all the different "standard" shapes that shawls/wraps seem to come in, and some notes on how to get that shape - This is not including ponchos. I've also (for the most part) excluded consturction methods that involve piecing.

  • 1) circular

  • 1a) gradual increase

  • 1b) puncuated equilibrium ( I'll explain later)
  • 1c) Pi
  • 1d) wedges
  • 1e) Circumfrence inwards
  • 2) Square
    • 2a) edge to edge

  • 2b) corner to corner
  • 2c) in the "round"
  • 2d) mitered
  • 2e) Perimeter INWARDS
  • 2f) Triangular - pieced construction
  • 2g) Log Cabin Construction
  • 3) Variations on a circle:
    • 3a) open

  • 3b) super-circular
  • 3c) semi-circular
  • 3d) PR2 - type
  • 4) Stole (rectangular)
    • 4a) worked lengthwise

    • 4a-1) edge to edge
    • 4a-2) on the bias

  • 4b) worked across
  • 4c) balanced halves
    • 4c-1) from the ends
    • 4c-2) from the middle

  • 5) Triangular
    • 5a)Single triangle: tip to neck - increasing

  • 5b) Single triangle: tip to neck - decreasing
  • 5c) Double triangle - tip to neck, decreasing
  • 5d) Single triangle - neck to tip; decreasing
  • 5e) Double triangle - neck to tip, increasing
  • 6)Faroese
    • 6a) neck down

  • 6b) edge up
  • 6c) "mock" faroese
  • 7) Ruana
  • know I'm probably missing some basics - as I will probably screw up on some construction techniques - but what the hey....

    Comments

    MMario's picture

    3) Variant Circle 3A) Open

    3) Variant Circle 3A) Open

    For an open circle you knit back and forth from the ends of your round rather then in a circle. This works best with patterns that are either solid or that have a strong center line or straight edge to them.

    3) Circle Variant - 3B) Super-circle

    if you take a circle with a motif that radiates from the center - and increase the number of repeats (for example from 8 to 10, or 12) then you end up with a superciruclar piece - The individual motifs will lay flat, but the piece as a whole will Ruffle if you try to lay it out, and when folded in half will form MORE then a half-circle

    3) circle Variant 3C) semi-circular

    Combine methods a and b by REDUCING the number of motifs necessary for a full circle AND knitting back and forth with an opening - and you can do any number of sem-circular shawls. Going LESS then a half-circle isn't very useful though. Laid out flat these will look like pies with a slice removed or half-circles.

    4)Circle Variant 3d) piR2 type [note- none of the bmethods below are the actual way the Pi-r-squared is actually shaped - but the "true" method is needlessly complex as far as I am concerned - these give the same basic shape with a lot less hassle]

    Not sure this should be here or in the "ruana" section - but if you take two squares or rectangles, lay them side by side and then connect them across the top with a half-circle. This could easily be done by piecing it, but also simply knit by knitting the two square/rectanglu pieces edge to edge, while forming the half circle from stitches cast on in between the two square pieces. Or, an alternate method would be to knit one square, then use short row shaping until you have formed a complete half circle and then knit the second square

    4) Stole 4a) worked lengthwise - By stole I mean a long, rectangular wrap - the longer edges being your top and bottom of the wrap and the shorter edges being the "sides"

    4) Stole 4a-1) edge to edge - This would be simply casting on the desired width/depth and continueing until the lenght is appropriate -

    4) Stole 4a-2) on the bias - basically starting with a few stitches and increasing until the desired witdth is attained - the increases can be along both edges or along one edge. Once the desired width is obtained you can either knit straight (which is essentially 4a-1 with a shaped end) or more often with this type the increases on one edge are then balanced with decreases on the other edge so that the knitting proceeds on a biased slant - until the desired length, when decreases mirror the increases of the beginning end.

    4) Stole 4b) worked across

    Cast on enough stitches to form the length of the shawl and knit until desired depth is achieved.

    4) Stole 4c) balanced halves - For this variation the two halves are worked seperately allowing one to mirror the lace in direction; either

    4) Stole 4c-1) from the ends - half the length of the shawl is knit from each end and the two pieces joined at the center

    OR:

    4) Stole 4c-2) from the middle - a provisional cast on at the beginning - work half the length of the shawl to the end , then return to the caston, pick up the stitches from your provisional cast-on and work second piece to the end.

    5) Triangular

    5) Triangular 5a)Single triangle: tip to neck - increasing - the simplest form is shaped by EITHER

    5A-1: increasing 1 at beginning (or end) of EVERY row having started with a minimal number of stitches.

    OR:

    5A-2: increase 1 at beginning AND end of every ALTERNATE row

    5) Triangular 5b) Single triangle: tip to neck - decreasing -

    Again, the simplest form of this can be done by either doing a single decrease at the center of EVERY row (you begin with a cast on equal to the length of the two sides)

    Or: doing a double decrease at the center of every ALTERNATE row. Of the two - the second is much simpler as the former method means you alternate between even and uneven numbers of stitches.

    5) Triangular 5c) Double triangle - tip to neck, decreasing - starting with a caston equal in length to the length of the two sides of the triangle :

    [Single decrease at beginning and end of the row; PLUS a double decrease at the center of the row ] Every Other row

    5) Triangular 5d) Single triangle - neck to tip; decreasing

    beginning with a cast on equal in length to the width of you finished shawl, single decrease consistantly either 1 at beginning or end of EVERY row; or at beginning and end of every ALTERNATE row.

    5) Triangular 5e) Double triangle - neck to tip, increasing

    starting with a minimal number of stitches, single increase at beginning and end of row, plus a double increase at the center. working the increases every ALTERNATE row -

    MMario - I don't live in the 21st Century - but I sometimes play a character who does.

    MMario's picture

    6) Faroese -- I bought the

    6) Faroese -- I bought the book Bundanaurriklaedid with the english translation of the text from Schoolhouse press; A Faroese shawl is basically two shaped triangles with a center panel (usually also shaped)- the shaping helps the shawl fit over the shoulders and stay on. Traditionally they are done in a garter stitch, starting at the outer edges and ending at the center neck. As a result of the shaping the basic triangle shape morphs into a 'butterfly' or 'angel wing' shape, with the arms of the trianbgle curving up around the center. The amount of shaping determins the shape and length of the curve.

    6b) Faroese - edge up. This is the traditional manner. A huge number of stitches is cast on (enough to equal the length of the two outer edges of the shawl plus a central panel) and regular decreases at the outer edges and either side of the ceter panel make the basic shape. additional decreases spread evenly through the side panels and to a lesser extent the central panel provide the special shaping. One could also knit an edging long enough to equal the cast-on length and pick up stitches along the edge before knitting the body of the shawl.

    6a) Neck down - basically, again, a double triangle with a central panel inserted between the two. regular increases occur at either edge and on either side of the central panel. Additional increases spread through the side panels and to a lesser extent the central panel provide the special faroese shaping.

    6c) "mock" faroese; double triangle with a central panel - worked in either direction but without the additional shaping. this still "fits" better then a straight triangluar shawl as the center panel fits around the neck

    MMario's picture

    7) the ruana - or about as

    7) the ruana - or about as close as a wrap can be to being a poncho without being a poncho. the traditional shape for a ruana would be square with two rectangles attached that form the front wrap. See the pi-R-square. (which is pretty much a rounded variation).

    Or you could think of it as an "open square" - open either from the center to the midpoint of a side; or open from the center along the diagonal to one corner.

    MMario's picture

    2) Square 2a) edge to edge

    2) Square 2a) edge to edge

    Probably the simplest means of constructing a square - cast on the width desired and knit until the piece is square.

    2) Square 2b) corner to corner

    A) Starting with a small number of stitches (usually no more then three) - add 1 stittch at the beginning (or end) of every row until the edges are the width desired for the square. The decrease 1 at the beginning (or end) of every row.

    b) you can add 1 at the beginning *and* end of EVERY OTHER row to the midpoint and then decrease 1 at the beginning and end of EVERY OTHER row as an alternative means of consturction.

    2) Square 2c) circular

    A square constructed in a circular manner seems a contridiction in terms - but if you are knitting in the round and put 4 evenly spaced pairs of increases in every other round, keeping the increases lined up on ieach increase round - you will find that you are knitting a square by going around in circles!

    2) Square 2d) mitered

    simple single miter: Start with a cast on 4 times the width of desired square :
    Every RS row double decrease in the center of the row - (either a pair of single decreases or an actual double decrease) until you don't have enoguh stitches left to decrease!

    2) Square 2E) Perimeter INWARDS

    this is sort of a combination of 2c) and 2D) Caston enough stitches to form the perimeter (outside edge) of your square - and do double decreases (or alternatively paired single decreases) at beginning of round, 1/4 mark, 1/2 mark and 3/4 mark.

    2) square 2F) In triangles

    A square can be formed of two, four or eight equal triangles pieced together. MORE triangles will fit together to form a square - but by that point you are really talking major constructions, and the size and shape of the triangles either begin to vary - or they form smaller squares that fit into the larger square.

    2) Square 2G) Log Cabin construction

    MMario - I don't live in the 21st Century - but I sometimes play a character who does.

    MMario's picture

    1)Circular 1a) gradual

    1)Circular 1a) gradual increase:

    This is a pretty simple concept. If you increase the number of stitches evenly 8 stitches every other round you will end up with a circular shawl. (Technically it will be an octagon - but blocks easily to a circle) Many patterns take advantage of this and the motif is repeated 8 times, with the motif increasing 1 stitch every other row; or some variation on number of motifs and increase per row that works out to 8 increases every other row.

    1) Circular 1b) puncuated equilibrium

    This is still based on the 8 stitches every other row equals a circle. But rather then a gradual increase over a number of rows this would be planned increase rows with wider spacing between the increases. Useful for doing concentric rings of lace motifs, especially if the lace motifs gradually grow larger as you get further from the center. the rate of increase can be changed at any point where the number of rows completed times four equals the number of stitches in a round and you will still get a circle.
    Even more useful for doing spiral patterns - especially when the number of "spokes" in the spiral is a multiple of four.

    (FYI - the term "punctuated equilibrium" comes from a theory of evolution where the status quo is rapidly changed, then settles back down)

    1) Circular 1c) Pi

    this method of constucting a circular piece is based on the formula"

    Circumfrence equals twice the radius times the constant "Pi".

    Basically , once all the math is worked out this means if you double the number of stitches in a round every time you double the number of rounds completed you will be making a circle. Extremly useful for doing concentric rings of lace patterns.

    1) Circular 1d) wedges

    By this I mean a circle constructed of short row wedges. The simplest variation would be to have 8 wedges, and each wedge would get one stitch shorter each row.

    MMario - I don't live in the 21st Century - but I sometimes play a character who does.

    MMario's picture

    1) Circular 1e) Circumfrence

    1) Circular 1e) Circumfrence INWARDS - for the truly insane - you CAN start with the circumfrence and DECREASE using methods a, b, or c ending in the center.

    MMario - I don't live in the 21st Century - but I sometimes play a character who does.

    MMario's picture

    oh crap. I forgot "replies"

    oh crap. I forgot "replies" got posted in reverse order. dang.

    and one last bit - One of my reasons for posting this is that I've found very little discussion of the various means of shaping shawls discussed on the web; and what there is seems to be in dribs and drabs. Pulling a lot of it together in one place may help reduce the frustration level for some beginners.