Which increase method do you prefer?

JE-DC's picture
Make One Away/Towards
4% (3 votes)
Make One (aka Make One Left & Make One Front)/Make One (aka Make One Right & Make One Back)
21% (15 votes)
Knit Right Loop/Knit Left Loop (aka Lifted Increases)
15% (11 votes)
Knit Front/Back (aka Bar Increase)
21% (15 votes)
I use a different method
3% (2 votes)
I use whatever the pattern says to use
30% (21 votes)
I haven't done a project yet that required increases.
6% (4 votes)
Total votes: 71

Comments

ivmanrob's picture

I like to knit in the back of

I like to knit in the back of the stitch and then in the front of the same stitch (k1bf). You don't get the bar this way, but end up with a nice smooth increase.

Joe-in Wyoming's picture

I use a variety of increases,

I use a variety of increases, based upon the project. For increases in my socks I usually do Knit front and back of the stitch because the leg increases are in the ribbing in my designs. Otherwise, it just depends on the look I want or the pattern directions.

colamanknits's picture

To me, it depends on what I'm

To me, it depends on what I'm working on that determines the kind of increase I want to do.

MMario's picture

I use primarily yarnovers or

I use primarily yarnovers or knit front & back; but that's because I do mostly lace. I use others as I feel like it or as seem appropriate.

bobinthebul's picture

Not sure what the distinction

Not sure what the distinction between make one r/l and make one away/towards is...I'm confused.

I'm mostly a sock person; I mostly use M1 R and M1 L. I.e. picking up the bar between stitches and knitting into it (to make sure I'm talking about the right one here). I suppose there is a tiny hole but when I twist the stitch (I always do) it's negligible. I like the look of the stitch; the lifted loop (if we're talking about the stitch below) is a bit less visible I suppose but it's still visible I don't like the look of the result. Of course this all depends on the color and type of yarn, how cushy it is etc.

The only time I've used KFB is for the zig-zag socks whose name I can't remember; it was fine for that pattern.

JE-DC's picture

As I understand it, make one

As I understand it, make one away/towards is a making a loop with the working yarn and slipping it on the needle. Make one L/R is where you lift the ladder between the stitches, place it on the needle, and knit through it.

This is my go to source for increases.
http://www.knittinghelp.com/videos/increases

CLABBERS's picture

Hi Joe, On the raglans

Hi Joe,

On the raglans I've made, I used the make-one left where, I go under the bar from the front, then ktbl.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmUSinUjZbE
For the other side of the sweater, I make-one right, where I go under the bar from the back, then knit. This stitch is awkward to grab sometimes, so I knit it a bit looser, then give it a little tug.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qCV0VC0Yim4

I also like kfb (knit one front and back), especially when increasing on the first stitch of the row. I am using this on the slippers I am making now to make the sole. I slipped the first stitch, then kfb to increase and shape the sole's heel and toe.

Mark

SAPBrown's picture

Unless the pattern specifies,

Unless the pattern specifies, I knit into the loop below.

I tend to think of bar increases as "beginner" increases. That being said, they do have their uses. Bar increases are the easiest to do on the first row. They can be used for character, works well for raglan shaping.

Make one increases (knit into the strand between stitches) I rarely use. Knit without a twist, makes a small eyelet. Mixed with Yarn Overs can give very interesting effects.

My two cents,
Stephen

SAPBrown's picture

After using "lifted

After using "lifted increases" a while, I dislike that, depending on direction, you work different levels/loops below the current row.

I started trying the "make one L/R" but found working the twisted stitch, tight and awkward.

Then it hit me, 'what is the difference between the running strand, and a yarn over?' Not much it seems, and the extra slack makes the twisted stitches easier to work. On the down side, each increase is worked over 2 rows.

Work the yarn overs as normal Make one L/R
To increase Right:
Knit the back of loop of (standard) yarn over

To increase Left:
Knit the front of a reversed yarn over (left leg forward)

just thought I'd share.

JE-DC's picture

I'm working on a top-down

I'm working on a top-down raglan (first one) and have been dealing with the upside-down aspects of it. The raglan seams call for increases, as opposed to decreases normally used in bottom-up raglans. I began to wonder if I needed to reverse the lean of the increases since everything else is being done opposite. After some thought, I finally had that face palm moment when I realized that just because the sweater is in the "wrong" direction, the knitting isn't. So, I'm doing my increase leans in the same direction I usually do.

This got me thinking what increases people prefer. Personally, I'm a lifted increase guy. I think they tend to be the smoothest.

Would love to hear what other people think.