Socks For A Friend - UPDATED

colamanknits's picture

ETA - *****My friend wearing his socks at work today.****

This is a pair of socks that I finished for my friend, Mark last night. I'm okay with the way they turned out except for the color variance between the bright green (on the left sock) into the almost Hunter green (on the right sock.) This is yarn by Opal that was given to me. I should have known something was up when I looked at the label and saw that there was no color way or lot number printed on it.

As I was working my way through the second sock, that's when I started noticing the change in the green color. I was not too happy with that, but continued on. As I got further into the second sock, I came upon a weaver's knot. That's when it dawned on me that this must have been a "reject" ball of yarn from them; hence no color way or lot number printed on the label. I hope Mark, whose favorite color is green, likes them anyway. This was the only green that I had except for some all green yarn. Oh, well. I hope he won't notice or care about the difference in the two greens.

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Comments

ILHIKER's picture

I can almost see his toes

I can almost see his toes wiggle with woolen pleasure.
Well done, Calvin.
Mark

colamanknits's picture

That's funny, Mark. I wonder

That's funny, Mark. I wonder if I should make one for his...........oh, never mind, lol.

JE-DC's picture

Good looking pair of socks. I

Good looking pair of socks. I haven't attempted them yet, but they are on my knitting "to do" list.

As for those pesky knots, if I'm using a natural fiber that will grab itself and hold (e.g. wool), I cut out the knot and do a spit splice. For other fibers, I cut out the knot and weave in ends as I go. I've seen a lot of videos online that show people weaving in both tails together, but I find this bulky. I do a slight variation where I weave in the new yarn for 10 stitches (or however many you feel makes a secure "join") before the change, drop the old yarn, pick up the new yarn (which is nicely secured and ready to go), then finish off by weaving in the tail of the old yarn for 10 stitches past the yarn change. Snip the ends and you're done. I do this when I join old and new skeins, color-changing, or even the tail from a cast-on. It adds less bulk, and the best part is it makes finishing a breeze because you don't have endless numbers of strands behind your work.

colamanknits's picture

Thanks, Joe. I'll keep that

Thanks, Joe. I'll keep that in mind when I come across another knot.

bobinthebul's picture

I second (or third, or

I second (or third, or whatever) the opinions; they look great and I wouldn't worry about the difference, especially where it mostly won't be seen anyway. I've used Opal twice and the second time I got a join - all it did was mean that one of my socks had a different colored cuff. If it's hand-spun yarn (like Noro) then I suppose it's normal, but Opal isn't hand-spun and it's not at all cheap either, so it can be annoying.

colamanknits's picture

Thanks, Bob. I didn't know

Thanks, Bob. I didn't know that about Opal, but I do tend to prefer to knit with Regia sock yarn if I'm buying something that's produced on a very large scale.

Crafty Andy's picture

Your socks came out nice. I

Your socks came out nice. I am not very keen on variegated yarns. I have been thinking on getting a sock blank from knit picks and dyeing my own colorway for socks. Great job!

colamanknits's picture

Thanks, Andy. It depends on

Thanks, Andy. It depends on the colors in a variegated yarn that determines if I like it or not. I've never used a sock blank before. Let me know what you think about it.

Joe-in Wyoming's picture

Since the tops of the socks

Since the tops of the socks are pretty closely matched, I wouldn't worry about it too much. After all, that's the part most people see anyhow. Maybe they aren't identical twins, but they are easily fraternal twins - or at least brothers. LOL

colamanknits's picture

That is true, isn't Joe.

That is true, isn't Joe. "Maybe they aren't identical twins, but they are easily fraternal twins - or at least brothers. LOL" That's funny. Have a good one.

Joe-in Wyoming's picture

Thanks. It's a play off the

Thanks. It's a play off the fact that I'm an identical twin. However, the original quote came from another knitter's blog, although I can't recall which one. I did coin the part about being brothers, though.

ILHIKER's picture

Calvin, I wouldn't worry

Calvin,
I wouldn't worry about the color anomaly. They both look great. Your friend will love them, I'm sure. I cannot tell you how man knots I have encountered in just the past three years. I have become an expert in hiding the joins after cutting the knot out.
Mark

colamanknits's picture

Thanks, Mark. You know, I

Thanks, Mark. You know, I guess I've been pretty lucky in that I haven't come across maybe only two or three knots in my sock yarn.

ILHIKER's picture

A year ago this past

A year ago this past December, I was rushing to get my first sweater done for my son. I was in a panic anyway because I had never tackled a long-sleeve sweater. In the 13 or so skeins of yarn, I had about 15 knots and believe me when I tell you that they were very poorly put together. Thankfully, the company I bought the yarn from made things right by giving me all my money back which I then traded in for the yarn I am using to make my own sweater. I thought I was having déjà vu because the first skein I used to make my swatch, there was a knot! Now, I rewind every skein I get, no matter what. I can work around the knots but don't like to be caught off guard. Thankfully, the sweater I made for my son, I joined the yarn back together in inconspicuous spots without wasting too much yardage.

colamanknits's picture

15 knots?!! That would have

15 knots?!! That would have upset me to no end. I'm glad that you were able to get your money back. Do you remember the brand name of the yarn?

KenInMaine's picture

They look great and I'm sure

They look great and I'm sure he'll like them. May I ask what sock pattern, or more specifically, what heel you used for this sock?

colamanknits's picture

Thanks, Ken. It's:

Thanks, Ken. It's: http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/search#query=David%27s Toe-Up Sock Cookbook . I think it's a great pattern. Let me know if you try it and what you think.

KenInMaine's picture

Thanks for the pattern info.

Thanks for the pattern info. Oddly enough, just a few days ago, I saved his Northman Mitten to my Ravelry queue. Small world!

colamanknits's picture

You're welcome, Ken. I'll

You're welcome, Ken. I'll have to take a look at his Northman Mitten. It it's anything like his sock cookbook, I'm sure it's well written.