Knitting caps an easy way?

Dgrendahl's picture

I just finished knitting a Beret for a friend of mine, the first for me. Anyway, I used two 16" circulars, a size 1 & 2. Well, before I finished I was needing to switch to a set of dpn's and I hated it so tried two 24" circular's. When I got down to a smaller number of stitches, I then had to use the dpn's. My question is this: has anyone knit a hat doing "magic loop" and if so, how did it go for you? Or, has anyone a super-kniffty way of knitting same?

AKQGuy's picture

Douglas, I hope that in

Douglas,

I hope that in the time since you originally posted this you have indeed dove into the deep end of Magic Loop knitting, and find that it saves you some time, effort and heart ache as you move forward in your knitting.

However, I urge that you don't give up completely on double points, or other knitting options. For one, you may find like many do that magic loop doesn't work for you personally as a knitter. Yes, dare I say, some don't find it to be the wondrous tool that many a knitter does. It just doesn't compute for them, or work for their hands.

Each technique and tool in knitting has come about because someone looked at some goal, the tools they had at their disposal, and either found a way to meet the challenge before them or thought to themselves, "Is there a better way I can do this?" Heck, in life in general, our tools and coping techniques have come about in quite the same way. I for one, am a creative cusser when met with a challenge. You should have just heard me a mere 45 minutes ago picking myself up off the icy pavement on the evening walk. One of the dogs is still hiding behind the couch from that particular coping technique.

And some of us appreciate the older techniques for what they represent to us. The passed down heritage of knitting someone we love or ourselves something to keep them warm. And in doing so, we relish the heritage we give our thanks to with using older techniques and tools. Or they just work for us, make sense and aid our abused hands.

What I'm saying is, don't feel the need to go out and buy the latest wonderful tools because someone who thinks themselves a knitting god, or even truly is a knitting god says they are so wonderful. Play around. Buy a few lower priced options, find a technique or two that works for you and your hands and then look at buying the nicer tools that will make said techniques easier for you. But whatever you do, don't become a slave to a single technique or tool. What would happen is said items weren't at your disposal? Would you quit knitting? I surely hope not. I hope that you would be a diverse enough knitter to be able to find a way past such an event and continue creating with whatever is at your disposal.

Save being a snob for the really important things... like good yarn.

Yours Truly,
A Bonafide Yarn Snob

Tallguy's picture

Oh, no, no, no!! You should

Oh, no, no, no!! You should never have to suffer through using short circs like that (16") and you shouldn't have to use TWO circs. All you need is a LONG circular needle (I prefer to use at least 36" but 40" is much better) and then you can do everything with it, from blankets and sweaters to hats and socks and even fingers of gloves! There is really no reason at all to have to get any shorter lengths, and you don't need double points! Really. I have a set of Options interchangeable needles, and think they are the greatest invention!

One of the very first things I would teach in a beginner knitting class is the Magic Loop method. Once you know that, there truly is no turning back. No project will stop you.

If you haven't seen this, you owe it to yourself in becoming a talented knitter to give this a try. You will love it for its versatility!

Nehkhasi's picture

I must learn this magic loop

I must learn this magic loop that everyone is speaking of. I've heard of it, but haven't had the pleasure of learning it or just what it applies to, but it sounds very interesting!

Dgrendahl's picture

Yesterday I stopped in at our

Yesterday I stopped in at our local yarn shop and got into a discussion with the sales-lady. She said that once she learned this method, there was 'no turning back!' On doing socks, this morning I have been experimenting with a size 4/40" and JMCO. Love those nice smooth needles. I placed an order on amazon.com for a ChiaoGoo 1/60" and will do so for the 0/60" and 2&3/60"! I know, but its xmas time and will treat myself.

Nehkhasi's picture

:-)

:-)

Thunderhorse54's picture

It's wonderful!! I use Magic

It's wonderful!! I use Magic Loop for socks, stocking caps, and anything small that needs to be done in the round. I use it for sweater sleeves if the pattern calls for them to be done in the round with dpns...I don't even use dpns anymore.

Nehkhasi's picture

:-)

:-)

Thunderhorse54's picture

I too, use magic loop for

I too, use magic loop for everything in the round since learning the method a few months ago. My knitting group knits Residual Limb Covers for our veterans. They're nothing more than a 2 x 2 rib cap. I work from cuff to end, and down to 8 sts. It works very well for me. I use Addi's. I've never heard of ChaioGoo needles. But, all in all...it can be done.

Thunderhorse54's picture

I too, use magic loop for

I too, use magic loop for everything in the round since learning the method a few months ago. My knitting group knits Residual Limb Covers for our veterans. They're nothing more than a 2 x 2 rib cap. I work from cuff to end, and down to 8 sts. It works very well for me. I use Addi's. I've never heard of ChaioGoo needles. But, all in all...it can be done.

Lumpynose's picture

I love the ChiaoGoo needles.

I love the ChiaoGoo needles. Lace or the non-lace ones with the bend; either works for me.

I prefer using two circulars over magic loop. I always feel like magic loop is stretching the 2 stitches at the other end, even though it looks ok when it's finished.

I'm doing hats from the top down. Wrap 4 loops around two circulars, then knit the top 4 loops with the top needles, then knit a round/all 8 stitches with both the working yarn and the tail which brings the stitch count up to 16; the Turkish cast on. The next round/16 stitches are a bit of a pain because it can be hard to separate the two strands of yarn. One place this is explained is Cat Bordhi's New Pathways/Insouciant sock book.

ilhiker's picture

I also use magic loop. I find

I also use magic loop. I find that the smaller the circumference, the longer the cord needs to be. I haven't used DPNs on hats or socks since I discovered magic loop a couple years ago.
Here's a good video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1mqIqRdJc68

Enjoy!

Mark

Dgrendahl's picture

In regards to this issue AND

In regards to this issue AND adding another query, how many of you have tried using the "ChiaoGoo Stainless Steel Red Lace Circular Knitting" needles? I have read that the "Signature Circs" are the best of all but very expensive. So, any thoughts out there on what you like here?

Bill's picture

I LOVE the ChiaoGoo Stainless

I LOVE the ChiaoGoo Stainless Steel Red Lace Circular Knitting needles !!!!
Co not like Signature needles. Too pricey, and my yarn catches on the join.

Joe-in Wyoming's picture

Magic Loop works well for

Magic Loop works well for caps and hats. Plus, I find the 2.25 mm Chiao Goo Red Lace knitting needles are very nice for Magic Loop while knitting socks. Hope this helps.

Tom Hart's picture

I do everything with the

I do everything with the magic loop. You can knit the fingers of a glove with the magic loop.