In a funk...

MitchPR08's picture

So for the few months I have been home from Germany and since I got this job. I have had a routine going. I work my crappy hours (3pm-11:30pm...plus an hour drive there and back) then come home and spin and/or knit for a few hours then go to bed. Lately, since finishing my last project I dont know what is going on. But when I get home from work I have been finding myself too tired to go and pick up the needles for this new lace shawl I am working on. Im trying to get it done before Christmas. But for some reason I knit a few rows then I find myself exhausted and unable to do anymore. Has anyone else experienced this? If so, what remedies do you recommend? Im thinking I just need a break from the needles for a bit and should turn my attention to my spinning wheel for a week or so and not think about the Shawl at all during that time. I dont know. Please, any suggestions you have I would gladly take into consideration.

Comments

Dwayne's picture

Hello new to this site it's

Hello new to this site it's so cool to find other guys that knit I wana try to also post a picture of myself but I am not sure how can anyone help please

michaelpthompson's picture

Taking a break from the

Taking a break from the knitting can certainly be helpful Mitch, as changing things up can often be refreshing. Plus, it takes off the pressure of worrying about getting it done before Christmas. You're thinking about something else instead.

However, from reading your message, I wonder if your problem is more with the hours you're working than the knitting itself. I've worked all sorts of shifts, overnight, swings (like you're doing), days, changing shifts every week, etc. It can be really stressful.

How well are you sleeping? Are you really getting a good rest? That can be difficult for people who do shift work. When I was working nights, a friend suggested earplugs for sleeping in the daytime. It really helped me a lot. I was sleeping, but not deeply, as my subconscious was hearing all the little daytime noises around me. Many people also find it helpful to darken the room where they're sleeping, or wear a mask. Too much light can also keep you from deep, restful sleep. And some people just have strong Circadian clocks that make it difficult to rest fully at odd times.

I used to work for a society of people who study light and biorhythms. I learned that having strong light, especially if it contains ultraviolet, at or near eye level, it can help you stay awake. I used this when I worked night shifts, to help maintain alertness. You might try something like that when you get home. I used a photo light bar that my aunt used to use to make home movies, but plant grow lights would be good too. Gets the body more into a daylight mode.

On the other hand, my sister-in-law used to love swing shifts. She would come home at midnight, putter around an hour or two, then go to bed and wake up late morning. Have you tried knitting when you wake up, instead of when you get home?

Maybe none of this applies to you, but I hope some of it can be helpful.

Tom Hart's picture

Would it be possible to

Would it be possible to bring the project to your job and work on it during breaks? Is your commute on public trans? I knit on buses and I get there in no time. (It's the most amazing phenomenon. They should study it.)

I've been doing a lot of public knitting lately. It's good for you. It really is. You get a lot of positive feedback. People are amazed at what you can do. Lately it seems I've been getting more knitting done during the day than I do at night!

WillyG's picture

Haha, last year I had no

Haha, last year I had no car, and the occasional bus/bus/train trip to the city (a mere forty minute drive) gave me about 3 hours of knitting time each way. I miss those days, in a way. Where I live it is also pretty necessary to have a car, and I often spend more time driving than knitting. Arrgh.

I second your thoughts about public knitting, Tom! I enjoy the occasional (almost always very positive) feedback and the chance to meet people. I especially love when other guys say how they are impressed.

MitchPR08's picture

Unfortunately, I live in

Unfortunately, I live in Texas and theyre all about cars here. Also, I work at the largest convention hotel in Texas (1840 rooms) at the front desk...So I only get one 30 minute break for lunch if Im lucky. Ive already tried to knit on my break and got a third of a row done since I kept getting interrupted...grrrr.

WillyG's picture

Here's a brainstorm, in

Here's a brainstorm, in addition to your idea of a break, which is probably in good order.

Maybe knit before work instead of after?

I second jessemkahn's suggestion of group knitting. I've been known to travel outrageous distances to knit or get some spinning mojo, although finances have made that a bit more unreasonable these days. When I was dragging my feet on the boxers KAL, I actually handed my project to the woman across the table to be a bit of therapy for her, but it also helped get me past that point that felt like I wasn't making any progress.

Kind-of in contrast to the break idea is to take a day or weekend and just stay home, and do a movie/ audiobook and knitting marathon. Something where you are distracted enough that you don't feel obligated to measure your progress. I'm amazed how far I get when I find myself shut in for a day or two. Similarly, taking just the one project to a place like a coffee shop (and leaving your laptop behind) can help keep you awake and nailed to the spot long enough to get some work done. I love the comfort of some good coffee while I knit. Again, if you can go during daylight hours, you might not have the added difficulty of potentially terrible 'atmospheric' lighting. I think the key here is to commit to something that gives you a reason to be present, but is boring enough that you can use a little lace to keep it spicy.

jessemkahn's picture

Sorry to hear you've caught

Sorry to hear you've caught the funk. But I bet finding a group of folks to knit with could help cure it! I have tons of trouble knitting by myself. I love sitting with a group, chatting, knitting, having a cookie or four, and just being with good people. It energizes me to get my knitting going.

All the best. Chin up!