WTF 2..

davidUK's picture

Well, I too am embarking on my first lace project and have now started the sleeve (it's a cardigan) more times than I care to imagine. It's not the trickiest lace pattern (k1, yfwd, k2, sl1, k2tog, psso, k2, yfwd,k1, yfwd) and then purl the other rows.

I'm just finding it hard to proceed in a mistake free vein and if I attempt to unravel anything, I'm not sure how the yo's work and end up starting all over.

HELP!!!!

DAvid

Comments

rmbm612's picture

I knit lace patterns often

I knit lace patterns often and have found that life lines AND the use of ring markers are essential tools when knitting lace patterns. The other hint that helps visualize the pattern is to chart the pattern. I find reading charts is easier than following printed instructions. For complicated lace patterns, charts are so much easier to read and you can see on the chart how the lace pattern progresses as you knit. I use a metal cork backed ruler that I found at Office Max. They are inexpensive, are available in lengths from 6" to 18", and don't slip and slide off the charted pattern. Ring markers also delineate the pattern repeat along the row or round. Its easy to count the number of stitches, YO, etc. as you knit. If I find a discrepancy in the number of stitches between markers more often than not , I've omitted a YO.

Joe-in Wyoming's picture

Life lines and patience,

Life lines and patience, that is about the best way to sum up learning to knit lace. Especially since you've challenged yourself to do a cardigan as a first project...I started out with an afghan/shawl. -- Books, knitting, cats, fountain pens...Life is Good.

steve kadel's picture

life lines are valuable. i

life lines are valuable. i also figure out exactly how many stitches you should have for each repeat section and count them out on the purl side and add or subtract there to make sure you kept all the yo's

we won't just get a cat, nubby nu nu, will manifest a kitten from our love and lint from our hemp socks

mwkbloom's picture

Once you've gotten through a

Once you've gotten through a purl row and are satisfied that it is all correct to that point, run a line of contrasting colored yarn through that row before you continue. Then, if you have to unravel, you only have to go back to that point. Periodically run a new line (but don't remove the previous safety line until you've run the next one).