Newish knitter fatally frogs a month’s worth of double-knittting

Tom Hart's picture

I was whining a couple of weeks ago at Monday Night Knit in San Francisco about how loose and loopy my double-knit bath mat was looking. So John (Knit One Sip Two) told me about Fallingblox and his double-knitting group on Ravelry. What a revelation! I found out, for instance, that you can slip-stitch double-knit projects, like a Barbara Walker Mosaic, if you want to. I tried it for a couple of rows and my work really tightened up and the problem was solved. But after always knitting with two colors at once, having to do one at a time was frustrating. I realized that the difference between the two methods was that there was no twisting of the yarn with the slip stitch. On single-layer, color work, twisting or trapping the carried color is a good thing because it makes for shorter strandage on the wrong side. But with double knitting you don’t carry any yarn. So twisting the yarn just adds extra, unnecessary yarn to the stitch, yarn that has nowhere to go and nothing to do and just makes for big, sloppy gauge and occasionally very large and loopy stitches. Not a good look.

So anyway I figured out how to do it right with two colors at once and make it all snug and proper. The gauge shrank massively, though. So much so in fact, that the project became too narrow for what I wanted. So I had to frog it. And I’m glad I did. The second edition is going to be a little different and a lot better.

And just to be clear: if it weren’t for the women and men (Andy, Tom, Stan, John and Bill) of Monday Night Knit I would not be knitting. Period. They taught me how to do it and they continue to teach me. Every week. Over dinner. It’s kind of excellent. I’m the only new knitter in the group. Everyone else has been doing it for decades. Mastery and depth of knowledge all around. For me it’s like being at the Oxford of knitting. And other than the price of a drink or bite to eat, it’s completely free. Social knitting. Very amazing phenom.

Comments

Crafty Andy's picture

Visit Crafty Andy's Blog

Visit Crafty Andy's Blog

YOu know that we love you and enjoy your company wether you knit or crochet, wether you slip stitch or just make us company. It is very nice to see the progress in you craft in such a short time. You are a great craftman and your presence is always welcome in our group. Thanks for sharing with us.

Stan Stansbury's picture

What Bill said. You've been

What Bill said.
You've been an extraordinary addition to our Monday group for the sense of dignity and high purpose that you bring to the craft, and your determination to really know it. Not to mention the fact that though I have been doing for decades, you've learned to do stuff I've never even tried.

WillyG's picture

Gosh. Social

Gosh. Social knitting...with guys! A rare treat, unheard of where I come from! Bless you all. I'm going back to my hole now.

Tom Hart's picture

Yeah, “it’s the bomb,”

Yeah, “it’s the bomb,” as the kids say these days. And it’s such a great place to come in out of the cold. (Yeah, it’s cold today in San Francisco but, hey, it’s the middle of summer: what can you expect?) It’s an unparalleled learning environment but it’s also a bit of a community. A community of people who make stuff with their hands. It’s an unusual deal all the way around. I’m very lucky.

Bill's picture

Tom. You have absolutely no

Tom.
You have absolutely no idea how proud of you I am... for the way you study, learn, explore and test!
Your work is admirable...

Tom Hart's picture

Thanks, Bill. You’re the

Thanks, Bill. You’re the first university professor who’s ever said anything remotely like that to me. Thanks. But like I said the environment in which I’m learning this craft is extraordinary.