Wrap and turn and turn and wrap....

vsidart's picture

I can't seem to get this one. When doing a wrap and turn in stockingette, do I slip, yf, etc, or yf, slip, etc? Is the slip knitwise or purlwise? No one seems to agree. There's gotta be a better way. I either end up with a big gap, or a really ugly stitch.
I found a couple of "alternative" methods on YouTube, but they've all made it look like a sheep exploded in the middle of my project. It can't be that hard. Help me!

Comments

OperaGeek's picture

Great posts - very helpful.

Great posts - very helpful.

Thor's picture

I ALWAYS have to watch the

I ALWAYS have to watch the wrap-n-turn video on YouTube by Cat Bordhi whenever I have to do them.

TheKnittingMill's picture

It depends on whether you're

It depends on whether you're knitting stockinette or garter stitch too. I've always read of slipping the stitch purlwise. I usually do my W&T on stockinette like Kenny and Ron described:

-On the knit side (public side) of stockinette knit flat, knit up to the stitch you will wrap and yarn forward. Slip next st on left needle purlwise to rt needle, yarn back, slip previously slipped stitch on rt needle back to left needle purlwise and tun work. You now have the first stitch on your rt needle wrapped clockwise and the working yarn is in front ready for you to begin purling back the other way.

-When performing a W&T on garter stitch, I work up to the stitch I want to wrap, then slip stitch to be wrapped from left needle to rt needle purlwise first. Then yarn forward, slip the stitch on the rt. needle to the left needle purlwise, and turn work. Now you have wrapped the first stitch on the rt. needle counterclockwise, and the working yarn is in the back ready to work the next knit stitch on the left needle. (If you try and do the first method on garter stitch, your working yarn ends up in front after the turn and you have to yarn back before making your first knit stitch in the opposite direction. You end up completely circumventing or strangulating the stitch instead of wrapping it with a sideways "u" and it lays really funky and is harder to eventually knit into).

Clear as mud? LOL

What to do when you actually get to knitting the wrapped stitch, delineates into several different schools of thought or techniques. Personally I like Kenny's method for its discretion of the wrap and is demonstrated on Youtube under Cat Bordhi's tutorials.

I know that the TechKnitter has a pretty inclusive write up on different short row techniques as well.

Kenny's picture

I have a hard time on this

I have a hard time on this one too. I can never remember, I always got to go back to the book.

But basically, I know you want to slip the stitch purlwise (so that when you're on the other side, the stitch orientation is still correct), bring the yarn forward, put the stitch back - tip to tip. There is your wrap. You are basically choking the stitch.

Then when arrive to the choked stitch again (can be knit side or purl side), you want to purl/knit the wrap together with the stitch and "throw" the wrap to the wrong side of the work, whichever it maybe.

I don't know if this is how everyone does is, but I'd love to hear if there is a better way.

ronhuber's picture

I have no idea how to do it

I have no idea how to do it correctly, but this is the way I do it. I bring the yarn to the front, slip the stitch,return the yarn to the back, and finally return the slipped stitch. You have wrapped a stitch. Now turn the work and proceed.I think!! Please prove me wrong if needed. If you slip a stitch purlwise, I feel you don't change its position on the needle as far as its legs go. When you encounter the wrap as you knit there are different ways to deal with it. One is to simply ignore it and often I do this if I want to use it as a design feature (I do this with sleeve caps), knit it together with the stitch or actually stick the needle into the wrap and put it over the stitch and then knit them together or ... The list goes on.