The baby blanket project

GrammarCop's picture

Since this is my first post on this knitting blog, I figured I'd post the last project I actually completed: a baby blanket.

One of my co-workers and his wife recently welcomed a newborn boy to the world. While I wanted to create a fitting gift for the occasion, I'm a relative novice at knitting -- perhaps six months or so -- and it was a challenge to find a baby blanket pattern that (a) I could actually accomplish and (b) would be attractive and interesting enough to present as a gift.

The blanket shown above wasn't my first attempt. I'd first tried a "windowpane" blanket, which required me to knit five vertical panels that could be stitched together. The outer and center panels were a solid color, while the other two panels alternated colors. When the blanket was stitched together, I was sort of OK with the color effect, but I was unhappy with the workmanship. Add to that an unfortunate snag -- one of the panels started to unravel, and I had no idea how to fix it -- and I knew I had to try again.

The biggest challenge for this baby blanket pattern had always been how to come up with a finished project that was clearly for an infant, yet didn't scream pastels. The parents are sort of hipster-y, skateboard-riding rockers who wouldn't be caught dead in anything sherbet-colored, so why consign their kid to that fate? I had to think long and hard about colors that were clearly male, yet that didn't come across as too cutesy.

Ultimately, I settled on a navy blue, set off by baby blue with a neutral gray for contrast. As for the patterns, I wasn't finding anything that really spoke to me. I knew I had to try something really ambitious.

Then it came to me: diagonal stripes. (Click that photo for a larger image.)

I had my ex teach me how to do increases that wouldn't show (yarn-over increases always leave those big holes) and I designed my own pattern, alternating the blues with the gray contrast stripe. It was the first time I'd tried my own design, and I was pretty pleased with the way it turned out.

Right now, I'm working on a new project: a cover for a throw pillow. The back is pretty straightforward -- stripes of varying widths -- but the front is a whole new ballgame. A new skill. Something my ex -- who's been knitting for years -- doesn't even know how to do. Heck, though, for my first time at intarsia, it doesn't look too bad!

Comments

charmingbilly's picture

's a great blanket! 

's a great blanket! 

GrammarCop's picture

Thanks! I hope the parents

Thanks! I hope the parents agree. ;)

GrammarCop's picture

Thanks -- it's always cool

Thanks -- it's always cool to get something handmade, IMHO.

Michael Cook's picture

Very nice!  I love the

Very nice!

 

I love the design and the colors - I am sure this will go over great with the parents.      

GrammarCop's picture

I hope so! We'll find out

I hope so! We'll find out after he returns from paternity leave.

GrammarCop's picture

Thanks for the kind words!

Thanks for the kind words!

 Fabulous work, well done.

 Fabulous work, well done. Will you be publishing the copyrighted pattern? Good for you trying intarsia.

Knit away, knit away

GrammarCop's picture

It's fairly straightforward,

It's fairly straightforward, really. I'm not an expert at knitting notation, but I'll give it a shot:

Knit using worsted weight yarn on size 8 circular needles. MC = Navy; CC1 = Baby blue; CC2 = Heather gray 

CO 2 stitches in MC.  

K 19 rows MC, inc in last st of each row

K 4 rows CC2, inc in last st of each row

K 20 rows CC1, inc in last st of each row

K 20 rows MC, inc in last st of each row 

K 4 rows CC2, inc in last st of each row

K 20 rows CC1, inc in last st of each row

K 20 rows MC, inc in last st of each row

K 4 rows CC2, inc in last st of each row

K 20 rows CC1, inc in last st of each row 

K 20 rows MC, inc in last st of each row

K 2 rows CC2, inc in last st of each row

K 2 rows CC2, dec by k2tog last sts of each row 

K 20 rows MC, dec by k2tog last sts of each row

K 20 rows CC1, dec by k2tog last sts of each row 

K 4 rows CC2, dec by k2tog last sts of each row 

K 20 rows MC, dec by k2tog last sts of each row 

K 20 rows CC1, dec by k2tog last sts of each row 

K 4 rows CC2, dec by k2tog last sts of each row 

K 20 rows MC, dec by k2tog last sts of each row

K 20 rows CC1, dec by k2tog last sts of each row

K 4 rows CC2, dec by k2tog last sts of each row

K 19 rows MC, dec by k2tog last sts of each row

Bind off. Work in loose ends.  

Parrot's picture

Very impressive . . . a real

Very impressive . . . a real newbie and taking on such a great project.  I know your friends will appreciate your creativity and efforts.  I look forward to seeing more of your work in the future.

Doug

 

GrammarCop's picture

Thanks! I'll refrain from

Thanks! I'll refrain from posting the requisite fuzzy hats and scarves I've already made.

RainCityRick's picture

Beautiful stuff man!  I've

Beautiful stuff man!  I've got to get started on a baby gift and this really gave me some ideas (and some courage.)

Welcome aboard (from another Puget Sounder)

Rick

GrammarCop's picture

We should get together

We should get together sometime to knit! Is there a local group?

Roberts,Great work.  I'm

Roberts,

Great work.  I'm really impressed you had the nerve to strike out on your own and do your own creative work after having knitted for such a short amount of time.  It's beautiful and very sophisticated.

~MIke in Tampa 

~Der Gefährliche Schal-Stricker

Yahoo Id: stickywarp2001

First Time = A Mistake

2nd Time = A Mistake

3rd Time = A Pattern!

 

GrammarCop's picture

Thanks! I've always been

Thanks! I've always been ambitious, I suppose. Never afraid to try bigger and better. ;)