Old friends

grandcarriage's picture

I got a contract to repair a dog-chewed Christmas stocking today. The woman brought it to me, and I had to laugh. It's the 1945 British Ladies' Home Companion pattern that I have previously done about 6 times. Ironically, I had the computer up and was able to pull up my ravelry account and show them to her. The yarn used on hers is far nicer than what I've used. It's either actual wool or red-heart SOCK WEIGHT. It's in remarkable shape. I must admit, when I get old garments to repair, I'm often stunned at the quality of the fibers used...Even the red-heart yarn (did you know that Red Heart also came in REAL WOOL?) acrylic, although harsh, wore like iron.

I love this stuff. Vintage knits fascinate me.

Comments

sonics's picture

I had to fix a slipper

I had to fix a slipper christmas gift that was knawed by a puppy yesterday. Cant believe how well the fix turned out. I had to wing it and guess.

albert's picture

Redheart was once wool?

Redheart was once wool? Lord, have they gone in the wrong direction- crying shame!

Joe-in Wyoming's picture

Sadly, that is so true. The

Sadly, that is so true. The petroleum industry sold them on the idea of "cheaper to make, more profit margin" which, of course, hurt the American sheep/wool industry as well. One local sheep raising family I know had to sell wool to China several years ago, finally cutting back most of their production to avoid financial ruin. -- Books, knitting, cats, fountain pens...Life is Good.

scottly's picture

I grew up with petroleum

I grew up with petroleum product yarn and didn't know any better until I was in college. I'm going to start paying more attention to vintage knitting. Good luck on reparing the stocking.

rjcb3's picture

Yes, I knew RedHeart carried

Yes, I knew RedHeart carried wool -- may family's shop carried probably what might have been the very last of some leftover shelf material that the distributor wanted to get rid of at earliest opportunity and even if only for peanuts, get something for it left over.

When I got that stash from freecycle a couple of years ago, a few of the skeins were RH wool and flooded back memories of when I was a kid walking to the shop after school. There was a spot under one of the shelves in the shop where we had a small black and white TV set up and I would either do my homework or -- what else -- knit!

Perhaps you might have a few of the same vintage books that I have. I have a few from the 30s, all the way up to modern day. My intention is to scan them all and then put them away safely so they won't get damaged. I love them so much. Growing up with my grandparents and hearing stories from their day and age firsthand, so many of the books just make me think VERY good thoughts.

Thank you for sharing...you've made my day just thinking about lots of things. I'm happy now.

)O(
Robert

Joe-in Wyoming's picture

I am a fan of vintage

I am a fan of vintage patterns and yarns. I remember, as a new knitter, when Red Heart was only available in wool, acrylics being considered a novelty yarn. [That was the late 1960s - early '70s.] Even so, many of the earlier acrylics were not as harsh as some you find today...if I didn't have the original ballbands for some of my older skeins, I'd swear they were wool from the feel. -- Books, knitting, cats, fountain pens...Life is Good.