altivo's blog

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Two socks at once?

OK, guys, someone here probably has the answer or a pointer to it. I normally knit socks with DPs or using two circulars. I knit from the cuff down because I don't like the way heels come out on toe-up socks.

I know it is possible to knit both socks in the pair at once using various techniques. Double knitting, where you do one sock inside the other on either DPs or two circs or even one circ (not-so-magic loop method) has intellectual appeal like a magic trick but seems unnecessarily complex and risky. It seems to me that you should be able to just work two socks in parallel on the circulars, using two balls of yarn. Knit across half of one, change yarn and knit across the other. Lather, rinse, repeat. Might get a bit tricksy at the heel, I guess, but should still work.

Has anyone tried this? Or can you point to a tutorial on the web that shows it with drawings or photos? With or without that, I'm about to embark on the experiment I think. I know that no one ever notices if there's an extra row or two in the cuff or foot, but I know it's there and it bugs me. This should prevent that, and produce matching stripes in self-striping yarn too....

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The judgement seat...

...is also a hot seat, at least in this kind of weather. Into the 90s again today, with high humidity and little breeze. Today was the day I promised to judge knit and crochet pieces for the county fair, so off to the fairgrounds at 9 am. Mary, the supervisor, was waiting for me and knew who I was even though we'd never met in person before. Easy, I was the only male judge in her division, Home Economics.

We started with the crochet work, and the only hard judgement call I had was to rank six crocheted afghans. Managed that and wrote suggestions to all the creators. Plowed ahead through several smaller categories, then had to pick best in show for crochet. It went to the best afghan, which was really a nice piece of work.

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OK, now I need help

I was taken aback a couple of weeks ago when I was approached first by Toni Neil and then later by Mary Macheroux at the McHenry County Fair asking if I'd be willing to judge the knit and crochet entries for this year's fair. I had some doubts about my qualifications, but in the end I agreed to do it.

It's official, the letter of confirmation arrived in yesterday's mail, so I'll be doing this on August 1. Hopefully, I won't be tarred and feathered for my choices.

Now I'm looking for advice on the subject. There are not usually a huge number of entries, and I know fair judges here get an opportunity to write comments to each entrant with suggestions and so forth. But there seems not to be any judging standard. I had expected something with so many points for design, so many for execution, so many for originality, appropriateness of materials, and so forth. I guess I can invent one, but if any of you are aware of articles on the subject, I'd sure be thankful to hear about it.

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Surprise

I was asked on Friday if I would consider judging the knitted and crochet entries at the county fair here.

I could do it, the number of entries is not usually terribly large, and I've certainly been doing this stuff long enough. But I have no particular "professional" qualifications. I've only ever taught one class, I don't write on the subject. When I asked "Why me?" the answer was just "Because we talked it over and thought you'd be good."

The judges give written comments on every piece, which I'd be willing to do. It probably takes about half a day, and they pay you $50. (Wow.) I just keep wondering if $50 is worth getting tarred and feathered for. :)

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Brief introduction

Hi, everyone. I've had this link sitting in my mailbox for a couple of months, but only got around to investigating today since I needed something to write about in my guild newsletter. Since I'm editor, I get to fill up space when things slow down in the summer.

Ok, so, about me: I've been knitting on and off for about 44 years, give or take a few. Mostly on for the last ten or so. I also weave, crochet, sew, and spin. Here's a sample of what I've been doing lately. The yarn is a handspun two ply from a dyed roving of Polwarth wool, very soft and warm. The scarf (since finished, but no photo of the finished item yet) is done in the old lace pattern "feather and fan," two repeats across plus garter stitch borders. Finished size 9 x 52 inches.

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