Tallguy's blog

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Pink and Blue

According to Smithsonian.com, the shift toward pink and blue happened gradually. For centuries, all children had worn practical white dresses, which could easily be pulled up to change diapers, and bleached when said diapers inevitably exploded. Pastel baby clothes were introduced in the mid-19th century, but according to University of Maryland historian Jo B.

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Silk Hankies

There are two spinning groups in the city, one in the north and one in the south. But many women go to both of them. I always enjoy going to these, but can't always get away from work to get to them. They run from September to June. At the June meeting, it is tradition for us to do something different, and to go out somewhere.

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Ashton Shawl

Here's something I've been working on. I have been spinning a lot lately, having received from a friend one fleece that she didn't want, and part of another from a local spinner. I've been having a lot of fun pulling out locks and spinning a very fine worsted yarn. Not sure yet what I will do with it, but there is still time!

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Further on grafting

There was some discussion earlier about provisional cast on, which serves a function very similar to grafting. And now there is a FREE, online Craftsy class with Anne Hanson, Ins & Outs of Grafting, to learn to seamlessly join pieces of any knit fabric for an elegant final result! This is only until April 12, so go and get it quick!

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Stash Busting pattern

This is a pattern I copied from someone that had photocopied it from somewhere else -- you know how it goes. There were a few notations on the pattern as some people tend to do, so I had to try and clean those out. It's a relatively simple pattern, and you can adjust size by using different weights of yarn and appropriate needle sizes.

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Stash-Busting slippers

So at our last guild meeting, many members brought in their Stash-Busting hats (see my entry of 2014-01-23). When the ladies took them down to one of our charities, they said they have enough hats, but they really need some slippers. Apparently, at some of the shelters, they can't be barefoot or wear shoes in their facilities, so they require slippers.

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Stash-busting Hats

At the last knitting guild meeting, one of the ladies brought a couple of hats she knit out of left-over yarns. She even made up a bunch of "kits" for us! She just put together some odd-ball yarns that were left over and there was not much left to make anything out of them. She used 3-4 yarns together, 10 mm needles, so it is a fast knit.

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Unusually shaped shawl

I have been looking at this design for a long time, and because it is so unusually shaped, I had to try it.

I have a lot of yarn on cones, and chose this green to use for this shawl. The yarn is very fine, so I used it double. I think it has some wool content, but I don't have the label anymore. It blocked very nicely.

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My Boneyard

Several months ago, in mid-winter, I knit Stephen West's "Boneyard". I had spun some wool on my drop spindle which was very softly spun. Normally, I like a yarn that is quite firm and has good definition. But I've been working lately with spinning much softer yarn with less twist. It is not easy! I wanted just enough twist to hold the fibres together, and just only.

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Cotton threads

Quite some time ago, I acquired a takli and some raw cotton. In fact, there was a lot of cotton! I have two grocery bags of ginned cotton, which is quite a lot considering how much handling needs to go into spinning a small amount of cotton. It goes a long way!

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