randalcarter's blog

The final design

Technique should be secondary to the final product. What is your conception? What do you, as knitter, want to produce? If I am working on a school sweater for a young, athletic child -- lots of running, playing, and moving involved -- I use durable yarn, lots of acrylic, machine washable and machine dryable, and a design that allows for movement. Usually a knit-in-the-round design, maybe using cut armholes or cut front for a cardigan. For a young woman's formal wear, I might use a tailored design, done flat on two needles and with seams to retain the shape of the sweater. The yarn is usually a fine yarn in luxurious fiber, perhaps cashmere, alpaca, or mohair. It all depends on the use intended for the end product.

Theory of design

Been reading the entries on inspiration vs imitation and thinking that most of us seem to agree that it's OK to draw from a pool of common knitting knowledge for basic designs, ideas on decoration, and techniques for accomplishing our knitting. But just when does a design become uniquely one's own? Sometimes hard to say.

While looking at Ulf's Scandinavian sweater, I had the thought that his work was a unique production, indeed. Each of the components of his design had been used before. But the final combination was something that had not been seen before. And a very impressive sweater!

Welcome, fellow knitters

Wow! What a wonderful way to get together! Haven't had too many opportunities to get together with others to discuss knitting. And, most knitters still tend to be women, so haven't listened to the male slant on knitting at all. But I really love the way MEN WHO KNIT is set up. Plan on exchanging a lot of opinion, information, and chat with the group.

 I started knitting about twenty-six years ago when I couldn't find a decent sweater for my little girl. My daughter is now in her late twenties and still loves Daddy's sweaters more than any other. In addition to sweaters, i have designed -- and knitted -- hats, caps, gloves, scarves, and socks. SOCKS! How much fun is that? Love the whole process of making socks. And love wearing my hand-knit socks. Love flooring people with the idea of an old coot like me working with dainty laces and needles.

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