Archive

April 21st, 2006

Jeff1201PA's picture

My first entry

This is where I will keep the details of my knitting projects and photos as well.

A little background for all who will read this, I started knitting about 2 months ago, after I lost my job.  I wanted to learn something that would keep me busy and occupy both sides of my brain.  One day, I saw a Learn to Knit kit that teaches how to knit cat toys at Target.  It came with a video and everything you need to make a few cat toys.  I have enjoyed knitting a lot so far, and I'm glad to have found a community of other men who are into it as well.

So far, I can only knit and purl in the English-style.  I can do simple increases & decreases, although I'm having trouble making the "invisible" increase (mine are plainly visible).  I have made all 3 of the cat toys the kit taught me (the fish, the mouse & the ball) and I started knitting dishrags. 

April 19th

The Hat from Hell

Bobble Hat

This is not the sort of project that would normally appeal to me, but it was a special request by a friend who positively assured me that she would actually wear such a hat.  More than once.  In public.

In a what-was-I-thinking-in-the-middle-of-the-night moment, I started knitting with worsted weight yarn on US 2 needles, producing a fabric which stands on its own and could possibly be substituted for Kevlar.  To make things worse, I used dpn's because I didn't have any  circular needles in that size.  Very soon I had to move one quarter of the stitches to a holder because they were falling off the needles, and I became rather adept at substituting needle for holder on every round.

Felted Hats

I just finished felting my second hat, and wanted to post some photos.  The first is a tiny little brimmed hat.  I made it small to start so as not to use too much wool if it didn't work out.  I was very pleased with the results and am going to do a full sized one just like it.  The second was the Garden Hat from the book "Felted Crochet."  It was huge before felting.  My daughter Kate tried it on for the before picture.  I was pleased with the results, but I don't think I'll use the same yarn again.  It was crocheted from Brown Sheep Lamb's Pride Worsted.  It's 30% mohair, so the final product is extremely fuzzy.  My older daughter, Erin, loves the fuzz, and the hat is for her, so it all turned out for the best.  I'm going to add a band of embroidered ribbon to finish it off.

April 18th

Knitting Belt and Wires

Finally found my knitting belt (in a box on top of the wardrobe...one of many!).  This is a shetland belt made in leather and stuffed with horse hair.  The rows of holes are to insert the needle in a suitable position.  I have seen a video of a shetland knitter using such a belt.  She averaged an incredible 300 stitches a minute!T while maintaining her pattern and talking to the interviewer all the while. She also managed to use only three needles to work a round - I'm not sure how as four seem to be the usual minimum. 

The 'wires' are from Guernsey (so from one of the northern-most of the isles to the southern-most).  These 'wires's, there are 8) are 18" (46cms) long and an old UK size 13 but they don't vary much across the UK.  These are steel and extremely uncomfortable to work with.  Often they bent themselves in to a curve. Thank goodness for Addi Turbo.

April 17th

WWII Mittens

WWII Mittens

Just in time for summer ... mittens from a WWII knit-for-the-troops pattern.  The accent stripes created extra work evening up the stitches and weaving in the ends, but in a solid color the mittens knit up really fast.  Since our boys in Iraq probably have little need for these, I'll just put them away until it gets cold again.

April 16th

kiwiknitter's picture

Forum Topic: James Norbury and the Method of Knitting

Yesterday, we went to an antique show/fair and one of the exhibitors was a woman who was furiously knitting.  Of course, I went to chat with her and discovered that she was knitting in the medieval method of holding the right needle still and tucked under the right arm while all the movements of knitting were done by the left arm.  The only involvement of the right hand was to throw the wool.  Those who have studied the history of knitting know that in the medieval ages the members of the knitting guilds wore special belts with a groove which held the right hand needle in a stationary position.  I must say that this woman knitted with great speed both the knit and the purl stitches.

kiwiknitter's picture

Knitting Poem

When my new book arrived from Canada, the owner of the shop included this old poem which I wanted to share.

The Prayse of the Needle

To all dispersed sorts of Arts and Trades,

I write the Needles praise (that never fades)

So long as children shall be got or borne,

So long as garments shall be made, or worne,

So long as Hemp or Flax, or Sheep shal bear

Their linnen wollen fleeces yeare by yeare;

So long as Silk-worms, with exhausted spoyle

April 14th

Bill's picture

Eye Candy!

check out the various exhibits on this site..

wonderful scarves...knitted, crocheted..felted...everything...
 
http://scarfcrazy.knotjustknitting.com 
 
Bill 

Jordan's picture

Sock Width

I've just started a pair of socks using the Universal Sock Pattern.  This is just my second pair of socks, the first being done in sport-weight wool and a bit loose all over.  I want to make sure I've cast on a good number of stitches before I get too far into it.  My stockinette gauge is 7.5 st per inch (though the leg will be worked mostly in K3 P1 rib).  So, per the pattern I've cast on 60 stitches.  To my inexperienced eye, after having done the cuff and a bit of the leg, this doesn't seem like enough stitches. 

April 13th

!?*&!

Think I've made a huge mistake buying the Eskimo wool for the Drops Design Hoodie.  Dreadful stuff.  Horrible. Made the mistake - against my own previous advice - of buying the wool on-line so hadn't seen how crap it is! and the colour is awful!  It's an unstructured yarn a bit like Lopi.  It is very thick and looks like the matted dangly bits off a lamb's backside and I'm not talking about the tail, you understand.  It splits constantly and is felting as I knit.  The colour is a bilious green and not the pleasant sage-green I thought it was.  Not good value at all although it only set me back £36 ($50?).  I seriously doubt that the garment could be worn more than a few times without trashing and I would say it would be impossible to wash or clean.  One for the dog basket I think, except I don't own a dog...bugger!