Archive - Apr 2007 - Blog entry

April 25th

ManMadeKnits's picture

Entrelac

It reminds me of a cookie.

ManMadeKnits's picture

Satchel

This was easy to knit, but hard to felt. It needed one more felting than I thought before I sewed the parts together, so I tried felting it one more time and some of the edges got a little wonky. Its still incredibly functional, even if the lines aren't perfect!

ManMadeKnits's picture

White hat

White had, rounded instead of flat.

ManMadeKnits's picture

Some of my projects.

These are, respectively, the 4th, 5th, 6th, and 7th things I've knitted ever.

The first are a pair of felted hats knitted with the same basic design, but shaped differently, the next is a satchel from knitty.com, and last is the entrelac scarf I'm currently making to practice my backwards knitting. Slowly.

Enjoy!

April 24th

prasad's picture

my first jumper

Okay, it's not the one I started first, but I was bored after I knit the front and back of my 'real' first. I needed some instant gratification and I've also never joined pieces together before and didn't want to ruin the pieces I'd spent months (off and on) making.

A co-worker suggested I knit something up using size 50 needles, those big red plastic 'speed stix' - my gauge using them is 5 st = 4", so things go quickly. Making this also gave me the chance to use up yarn that I've had for over a year - New Zealand wool, the name's Bulky Lopi I think, I balled it all up and threw out the labels. It's got a nice rustic look, but it's a bit furry and too scratchy for tighter stitches. It took me the weekend (mostly putting it together) plus some finishing Monday night crocheting a neck band. Now I have a few questions, and any advice would be helpful.

1) The shoulder seams are gigantic. While it's nice to look broad-shouldered for once, is there a good way to attach pieces 'end to side' and not create a big seam?

2) How do you weave ends in without it being visible from the right side? This is something I can't find any info on in my (very small) knitting library.

3) Patterns! I need more, for things like men's jumpers, scarfs and hats, that aren't hideous.

Greetings

Cruising into my 12th hour as a member, I will start this blog, see where it goes and assess a bit later. As my intro stated, I've been knitting uhh, maybe 2 months. I have mastered dishrags, using them to figure out gauge and textures. Love doing seed stitch and ribbing, but, face it, it's early days and much yet to learn. My first real product was a stocking cap made from some Jamison wool, worsted, I believe. All went swimmingly until I hit the part where my circulars were too big and there was no way to continue. My instructor (aka Jan, my good friend) probably did tell me about transferring to dpns, but, well, I didn't retain that. So, I made an executive decision to end it where it was, and, fortunately, I can wear it and it looks great, though somewhat truncated... A decent first project. The learning curve is steep, as it should be. I downloaded a free pattern from a blog on Menknit.net for a London Beanie ( like David Beckham wears - woo-Hoo!) and that will be the next project. comments welcome. I am just relieved to find that there are so many men who knit. Go figure. I never suspected....

April 23rd

Kerry's picture

Candle flame lace shawl

Fresh from being blocked is my latest FO, the Candle Flame Shawl (a freebie pattern by Knit Picks). It is knitted in Australian 2ply laceweight wool, cranberry shade, by Bendigo Woollen Mills (email them for a free shade card).

krooks's picture

I was very Bad on Saturday!

I went to the North Carolina Mountains (Robbinsville, N.C.) for the weekend. Stopped by the LYS in Murphy, N.C. - Yarn Circle (www.yarncircle.com). Bought way too much yarn goodness. This shop is near the John C. Campbell Folk School (www.folkschool.com). Has wonderful selection of natural fibers, spinning supplys, etc. It is worth the trip if anyone is in the area. Later Guys.

April 22nd

ManMadeKnits's picture

A lifelong passion

Salutations, everyone!

As you might read in my profile, I started knitting in Japan. After I sold all of my video games, I went to the 100 yen store and bought some needles and yarn. After seeing me struggling to learn from some diagrams on the internet, my host mother kindly called up another mother from the neighborhood--the mother of a boy who had started going to school again once he heard an American (myself) would be teaching English there. She kindly came over and taught me how to cast on, knit, purl, and make ribbing. It was so that my first scarf, a grey and black ribbed masterpiece, was born and a new passion discovered. Since getting back to school, my friend has been eagerly providing me with new things to try and this semester has produced 4 different hats and a felted satchel. Future endeavors include gloves, more scarves, and surely a sweater or two. I'm always looking for a challenge, so weird patterns are always exciting.

I don't know who will end up reading this, but I'm excited to meet other knitters, male or otherwise, in my future travels.

April 21st

kiwiknitter's picture

Grafting Question - Help!

I'm currently knitting the "Scalloway Yoke" jumper from the book "The Art of Fair Isle Knitting" by Ann Feitelson. Those who may have this book can check out the pattern. When attaching the sleeves to the body, the pattern calls for grafting live stitches and then continuing to graft live stitches to a selvedge line. I can Kitchener without problems, but I don't know how to graft to selvedge. Does anyone have any experience or knowledge with this? Any links to on-line tutorials? This recipe is a bit more complex than I'd expected. The stranded pattern is not difficult but the method of doing the yoke is news to me. Ah, the challenges of life!

Any assistance will be greatly appreciated! Cheers!