Archive - Nov 2006

November 6th

Gerard Allt's picture

thank you to those of you who have sent it blue squares

The river is quite massive now. Only a small % of the squares have been sew together. I can't wait til it's all finished and the squares are all sewn up!

November 5th

drmel94's picture

More Monmouth

All this talk about the Monmouth cap has had me reading up on it a bit and I got interested in some of the little details, especially after noticing in this example that there are some apparent increases/decreases in the hem to make the brim a bit wider and the brim where the hem turns is clearly more than just a simple purl row, though it's not clear if the hem was knit to the outer edge & the two sides cast off together or if there might be something else going on.

So I posted a query to the glb-knit listserv, primarily to see if Sarah Bradberry had any more to offer, but also to see if anyone else there might know more. Sarah suggests that the brim might be some sort of braided slip stitch turning row. She's also hinted that she's playing around with fulling, which was done with the original caps, and might have something about it in the rewrite of her hat book, which she's working on.

Gregory Patrick's picture

The Zen of Purling

I was caught knitting at work today, bored out of my mind, catching glances from customers and coworkers alike as I did my best to pass time. Someone finally asked how long I had been knitting and how I learned. Three years ago I passed a J. Crew window display with the most beautiful sweater I had ever seen, but was dmaned back to reality by the $300 price tag. I was first depressed that my financial situation was so crappy that I couldn't be worthy of having nice things. ("Quality and Expensive are neither the same nor better than one another," my grandmother used to say). Then I grew irritated and pissy that I couldn't have THAT sweater. That irritaton grew into an aggressive stomp to the nearest bookstore where I picked up a copy of "The Idiots Guide to Knitting." From there I went to Joann's and got myself on the mailing list and with each coupon I received, I'd purchase one skien of cashmere. Within 6 weeks I had that sweater, made myself and looking every bit better than the one in the window. The action of knitting is one that can lend you into an active contemplation, where the body and mind are quietly seperated into an almost meditative state. But, even more than this moment of frozen suspension of the world around me, I have found that I have learned tolerance (from patterns poorly written), patience (from mistakes made in haste), and the absolute art of self reliance.

grandcarriage's picture

Side to side sweater

Someone was asking about a side to side sweater. Here is a raglan one I did last winter in Plymouth Outback Mohair: A very good value~ 52" chest sweater in 4 skeins for a total cost of $45. It is very comfortable and light, not too warm, and was a very fast knit. I decided that I prefered it in reverse stockinette, although I have the same yarn in a different color and may do saddle shoulder side to side in regular stockinette, just to compare the finished results.
The decrease bands in "X's & O's" cable were knit separately and added afterwards. The collar and waist rib were added last. (I will probably take off the bottom rib and put on a rolled hem: I don't like the rib in mohair. The collar is doubled over on itself. Note how good the variegated yarn looks side to side: Kind of a rorschach test pattern. I get lots of compliments on this easy and quick sweater.

grandcarriage's picture

somewhat fancy

This was my senior studio thesis project for my BFA in 1990. It is a hand-doubleknit scarf, fully reversible as you can see. Some of the yarn was handspun by me: The fuzzy carmel colored one is Collie (leftovers from a commissioned sweater/blazer that I spun/designed/knit~ I can't find pictures of that creation, don't ask)

The scarf is NOT a tube, but a flat piece of fabric. Similar to double weave, but identical front and back, where as doubleweave is the reverse front to back...like a negative. It is approx 7 feet long and mainly wool, silk, collie, angora, with a little linen, mohair, and rayon thrown in. It has held up pretty well for 16 years of use (although I keep it for "special" as you can imagine).

PS: The collie yarn is fabulous: Incredibly soft and furry, doesn't shed...you just want to "roll around nekkid on it". The sweater/blazer was done for a collie breeder who wanted something to wear while showing his dogs in the cooler months: It was a shaped cardigan like a blazer with a shawl collar: Made in sock weight collie plied with a fine tussah silk. It was gorgeous, and he had it lined. I don't know how warm it was: It was done to his measurements, and

grandcarriage's picture

Christmas stockings

Here is the 1934 "Ladies Home Companion" (Uk version) Christmas stocking. The finished one is by "granny" for client in 1971. It is being knit in fingerling weight acrylic/nylon (hard to find christmas colors these days in real wool). I am turning the heel on the sock right now and should have it completed in an hour or two. I will be swiss darning the name and various details on it.

I think I will detox after I finish the second one by knitting some "Dr. Seuss" Christmas socks...big candy striped ones in red/white or green/white with 7 toes, or something. Or maybe with one long pointy toe, ala "Who-ville". I am just a little cutsie-d out. I need something bizarre.

Help Knit a Scarf for a Trafalgar Square London Lion for Cancer Research!!!

Good Day to You Manly Knitters!

We want you to be part of warming up a London icon for charity!

As you may or may not know Stitch and Bitch London are attempting to knit a gigantic scarf for one of the rather chilly-looking Trafalgar Square lions. The scarf will be raffled off for Cancer Research after being presented to the lion in the New Year, and one lucky winner will get a 43.5 foot scarf to wrap around their armchair/tree/house/partner.

The scarf will be presented to the lion in the New Year so you have plenty of time to knit your bit.

We would like as many people as possible to knit a piece of it. You can knit the smallest, teeny tiny part or a huge chunk, in whichever yarn you fancy using. If you wish to begin knitting your part of the giant scarf at home here are the dimensions.

The scarf will be an enormous:

10 inches (25.5cm) by 43.5 feet (13.25 metres)
Yarn: The most hideous or bizarre yarn you have.

JOIN US FROM ANYWHERE IN THE WORLD!

FOR AN ADDRESS TO SEND YOUR PART TO EMAIL US:
stitchandb.london@googlemail.com

Keep up with the beast's scarf at our website
www.stitchandbitchlondon.co.uk

Please join us and knit for the brave people fighting cancer. Pass it on to anyone you know anywhere in the world. Let's give that lion an international scarf he can be proud of! :)

November 3rd

Eikon's picture

Lace again

http://knitty.com/ISSUEspring05/PATTbranchingout.html

The chart is in there. I am loathe to post it as it has a copright.

Thanks everyone!

~Jason

grandcarriage's picture

knitting frenzy

CRAPPY WEATHER. I work outside as long as I can bear it. The flat is halfway turned into a fiber studio, and looks like a tornado hit it. My current projects are mostly repair, BUT I got a coolish commission last night: To knit a pair of Christmas stockings from a 1930ish pattern for two young kids. Evidently granny has knit abot 30+ of these stockings for the family, but is too old to do it anymore, and the youngest are the only ones bereft. It's not hard: The pattern is poorly written, but I have a sample to work from...Just a long skinny stocking with chilren in intarsia, then a panel with santa, and then a panel with pine-trees before it becomes a standard stock bottom. What I stand to make from these will pay half a month's rent. AMEN! And, I borrowed a digital camera, soI can finally photograph some of my knit projects. Hoo hoo!

Eikon's picture

Lace Dillema

So I am making my first foray into lace and I am at a loss. How do I not do a stitch and carry the yarn with me in the squares that are marked as black boxes?

~Jason