fiber trends felted clogs

knit_knot_eat's picture

I know that many people have made the fiber trends felted clogs. I'm thinking of making them but have a few questions before I buy the pattern.

1 - how difficult is it? If you had to rate it, beginner, easy, medium or hard which would it be?
2 - in your opinion, what is the most difficult step (this will help me determine if I can do it)
3 - what kind of yarn do you need to use, and where do you get it.
4 - what size needles do you need (if I don't have the right size, I need to factor that into my cost)

Thanks

Comments

rmbm612's picture

Reason for the spare needle

Reason for the spare needle in a smaller size. The first sole of the slipper is knitted and set aside. Then you knit another sole and the body of the slipper. Once that's done, you use one needle to pick up stitches around the sole of the completed slipper and one needle for the sole you set aside. Using another smaller sized needle you join the two soles together using the 3 needle bind off.

Nathanael's picture

1 - I would rate the pattern

1 - I would rate the pattern as beginner willing to experiment. I think that these were the third or fourth item that I knit. As others have said, follow the pattern exactly, including the M1 details. It does involve a great amount of counting, so I find this is best to do in a quiet environment. Read each row instruction before delving into it. Some instruction rows could be over 140 stitches, while others may only be 30-40. It all depends on the turning of the piece.
2 - I would say the most difficult step is to just do what the pattern says, without trying to interpret or edit the pattern as you go along. Some steps seem do not seem logical initially. But, go with the pattern and you'll see there is definitely a method to the pattern.
3 - I used Paton's classic Marino yarn. It is a standard yarn at JoAnns and Michaels. It was great to work with and felted beautifully on the 1st attempt (even with a front loading washer).
4 - I used size US 13 needles. You need circulars that are the proper length. It is great fun to see how the double/triple needles play into the finished slipper...its ingenious.

Go for it! These are great fun and come together quickly, with the double yarn!

YarnGuy716's picture

I will say that this is a

I will say that this is a great pattern and I have made several pairs of them. Mom and I are both on our 2nd pair as we wear ours all the time. The pattern can be finicky, but gets easier after you've done the first pair. As it progresses you will see how the shaping is working and it will make more sense to you.

For keeping place, I stick a post-it to the pattern on the line I am working on. I also count the entire time. So this is not a project for knit night or while watching television. It can be done, but that doesn't make it easy.

The short row shaping is not all the difficult. Plus, since you are felting the finished slipper it does not have to look perfect. I don't even bother picking up my wraps on the short rows.

Working with 2 strands is exactly how you are thinking. The most important thing is to be sure you work both strands when you knit. Sometimes you might only catch one strand, but it is easily fixed and again felting the finished project hides that sort of thing.

My advice to anyone giving these a try is "Follow the pattern exactly." It is well written and if you follow line by line they will come out great.

I've used Patons Classic Merino Wool for all the slippers I made. It felts great.

rmbm612's picture

I'd agree with Joe about the

I'd agree with Joe about the difficulty level. Most difficult part is organizing a system to keep track of where you are in the pattern. I've made several pair of these and found like anything you knit, the second slipper is easier to do. Here's my breakdown of cost, assuming you are making these for yourself.

Men's medium or large clog: 750/850 yards of wool remember you use two strands throughout.
Cascade 220 4 skeins ~ $30.00
24" circular Needles ~ $15.50 I only buy Addi Turbo but that's your choice I use two 24" circulars both US 13
spare circular Needles ~ $15.50 in a smaller size
pattern ~ $4.50 - $5.50

Stitiches/techniques: K, P, Wrap and Turn(shaping using short rows), SSK, M1, picking up stitches, knitting outer sole to the sole of the slipper

Felting: access to a agitating machine (new front loaders don't work for me); time and patience. Once you start the felting process you need to be in attendance the entire time. Sizing the slipper to fit you requires frequent checking and trying them on as the felting progresses and it can suddenly accelerate. And yes that means sticking your bare foot in a wet wool slipper! Don't buy superwash wool or white.

Good luck

knit_knot_eat's picture

K, P, SSK and picking up

K, P, SSK and picking up stitches - I got no problem.
Wrap and Turn I got, but not sure how to pick them back up when increasing the short row.
M1, any M1 or a specific method? I typically Knit Front and Back.
What do you mean be 'knitting outer sole to the sole of the slipper' - is that just for the picking up?

so 2 size 13, 24# circulars.
Why the spare pair?

YarnGuy716's picture

Actually if you use Knit

Actually if you use Knit front and back you will throw off that important stitch count. I saw someone doing that who could not figure out why her count was off. I believe the pattern even tells you how to do the M1.

The double thickness of the soles are joined by knitting both together. The pattern is very detailed and they do explain these finicky bits. Plus lots of guys here have made them. There is also a Fiber Trends Felted Clog group on Ravelry, with a wealth of info.

teejtc's picture

You're right, the pattern

You're right, the pattern gives instructions -- I'll admit though, I tend to simply use the Reverse Loop approach (I think it's easier and quicker). It seems to work just fine and after fulling I don't think it's noticeably different looking.

(is "quicker" a real word?!)

Anyhow....

Grace and Peace,
`tim

Joe-in Wyoming's picture

Hey...works for me. --

Hey...works for me. -- Books, knitting, cats, fountain pens...Life is Good.

QueerJoe's picture

For the stitch questions, M1

For the stitch questions, M1 usually means picking up the yarn between the stitches in the row below and knitting into it...but it doesn't really matter since you'll be felting the whole thing and knitting into the front and back won't show a difference.

I forgot about knitting the outer sole to the sole of the slipper...if I remember correctly, you knit the sole and then the upper, and the you do a 3-needle bind-off...that's why you need the spare needle to hold the sole stitches while you knit the upper???

HuskerChub's picture

As Vince states above, it

As Vince states above, it does make a difference on M1 or inc.1 (knit front and back). If you inc 1 instead of M1 your counts will be off. This is one of the most difficult things to wrap your brain around (or was for me). My brain is not working right now so can't explain it well enough to not confuse people. Just please trust us, use a M1 but picking up the yarn from the row below (and make sure to twist it or you will create an eyelet or hole what will not felt closed) OR a backwards thumb loop.

knit_knot_eat's picture

Define weekend in terms of

Define weekend in terms of hours?
I've done short rows (for socks). But I don't like how I do them. I was going to try 'wrapping' on my next pair. Does the pattern call for that?
I've picked up stitches before, it is a pain, but I can do it.
Is two strands hard? Is that holding 2 strands of yarn at the same time (sort of like how I join a new skein and carry the old one with the new one for a few stitches)?

As for keeping track of where I am, I suck at it. But it is something I should learn to do. Keeping track of what row I am on isn't that big of deal, I have more problems if I need to keep track of stitches within a row.

QueerJoe's picture

I'll take a crack at these

I'll take a crack at these questions:

1. I'd probably rate it a medium, because the shaping requires quite a bit of keeping track of. If you're an organized knitter, who can track where they are in a pattern easily, it should be easy...if you're careless and always forget what line of the pattern you're on (like me), it could be more difficult.

2. A couple parts could be a little difficult...if you've never done short rows, this would be a new learning experience. I also find picking up the stitches at the bumper is a little finicky and hard on my hands. Other than that, they're pretty easy.

3. You use two strands of worsted weight yarn. Paton's Classic Wool, Cascade 220, KnitPicks Wool of the Andes would all be good choices.

4. Ravelry tells me its US13 (9.0 MM)

I'm not a fast knitter, but I'm very persistent, and I can knit up a pair of these in a weekend if I focus a lot of my attention on them.

QueerJoe's picture

I'll take a crack at these

I'll take a crack at these questions:

1. I'd probably rate it a medium, because the shaping requires quite a bit of keeping track of. If you're an organized knitter, who can track where they are in a pattern easily, it should be easy...if you're careless and always forget what line of the pattern you're on (like me), it could be more difficult.

2. A couple parts could be a little difficult...if you've never done short rows, this would be a new learning experience. I also find picking up the stitches at the bumper is a little finicky and hard on my hands. Other than that, they're pretty easy.

3. You use two strands of worsted weight yarn. Paton's Classic Wool, Cascade 220, KnitPicks Wool of the Andes would all be good choices.

4. Ravelry tells me its US13 (9.0 MM)

I'm not a fast knitter, but I'm very persistent, and I can knit up a pair of these in a weekend if I focus a lot of my attention on them.