Hemlock Ring Throw for a Baby

Crafty Andy's picture

BabyHemlockRIngFOblocked (2)
Baby Hemlock RIng throw. This is the same throw that Mr. Flood helped design, but adapted to a Baby Size, done in Acrylic on US 6 or 4mm. This was a wonderful way of being introduced to lace, the casting of is magnificent, I did not understand all the fuzz about it. I found it very cleverly done. Thanks Mr. Flood!
BabyHemlockRIngFOblocked (3)

Comments

rjcb3's picture

Very beautiful, Andy! I like

Very beautiful, Andy!

I like the colour, too! It's just so nicely done...a very lucky baby, indeed.

I really like that casting off, too. I think I'm going to try that on my next poncho, in fact.

Thank you so much for sharing it.

)O(
Robert

Buck Strong's picture

It is very beautiful Andy!

It is very beautiful Andy! I'm very intrigued by the pattern. Maybe this would be a good pattern for some of my stash yarn.

"A man may fight for many things. His country, his friends, his principles, the glistening tear on the cheek of a golden child. But personally, I'd mud-wrestle my own mother for a ton of cash, an amusing clock and a sack of French porn." Blackadder

mrossnyc's picture

Very nice and the cast off

Very nice and the cast off does sound interesting.

Thomasknits's picture

I love this blanket. I'm

I love this blanket. I'm going to make one that is much larger than the lap blanket that Jared Flood specifies. Someday I'll get around to it.
-Thomas

Buck Strong's picture

OMG! That's my plan too.

OMG! That's my plan too. Especially the "Someday I'll get around to it" part.

"A man may fight for many things. His country, his friends, his principles, the glistening tear on the cheek of a golden child. But personally, I'd mud-wrestle my own mother for a ton of cash, an amusing clock and a sack of French porn." Blackadder

WillyG's picture

Mine has been sitting in a

Mine has been sitting in a bag the latter half of the summer. Just last night I pulled it out, and while I didn't actually knit any stitches, it watched TV with me. The weather is cooling off (yay!), and I'm thinking more seriously about finishing it.

MMario's picture

What cast off gets used? I

What cast off gets used? I don't think I've heard anyone mention that before.

Crafty Andy's picture

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k2 tog , YO, K2 tog, then turn , P1, In the yarn over k1,p1 (twice) K1 again for a total of 5 stitches in the yar over, then purl 1, slip 1,then turn and bind off 7 stitches. givers you a great edging that looks crochet, but less work.

TomH's picture

Thanks, Andy.

Thanks, Andy.

Joe-in Wyoming's picture

Thanks Andy! I thought it

Thanks Andy! I thought it was crochet so didn't look very close. I may have to use this on a future project. -- Books, knitting, cats, fountain pens...Life is Good.

MMario's picture

That is an interesting bind

That is an interesting bind off!

MMario - I'm not divorced from reality - we're having a trial separation
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MMarioKKnits/

Joe-in Wyoming's picture

Very nice and a great idea.

Very nice and a great idea. I've adapted several other projects in a similar way. It's a great way to spark your creativity. -- Books, knitting, cats, fountain pens...Life is Good.

Nice work Andy.

Nice work Andy.

ksmarguy's picture

I loved doing the hemlock

I loved doing the hemlock ring. It took a little bit and several starts for me, but once I did it went so quickly and I was VERY pleased with the result. Great idea for a baby, though, it looks great!

Tallguy's picture

The Hemlock ring blanket was

The Hemlock ring blanket was knit by Jared, true, but he didn't design it. It is a very old lace doily from 1942. http://tinyurl.com/lu7tae

There is nothing stopping anyone from knitting the exact same pattern using any yarn and needles they wish. I have knit a doily pattern as a dishcloth for a long time using dishcloth cotton and needles suitable to the drape I wanted, but have also done the very same thing with sewing thread (why not?) with the same number of stitches and rows, to come out with a tiny coaster. With very thick rug wool and suitably large needles, it may become a rug. The very same pattern, the same number of stitches and rows -- only the yarn and the needles change. You can do that with ANY pattern... it's all up to you what effect you want to achieve. You are in control.

New York Built's picture

Tallguy, I liken your point

Tallguy, I liken your point above to perception and reality. All that we know is filtered through our brain to our mind. Our perception is our reality. (Thank you, Walt Whitman!). Once again, the devil is in the details, which our brain conveniently fills in for us when we choose not to see them, or we are directed to look elsewhere.

If memory serves me (and it doesn't - "Thank you, Marcelle Proust!"), Mr. Flood wins great praise for his photography and marketing skills. He covers himself with less glory when it comes to attribution and more glory for selling his persona to a generation that often has difficulty of doing anything without a cookbook recipe. An engaging public speaker and presenter, I give him credit for being the Rachel Ray of knitting. (Not a bad thing at all, and very passionate, and GREAT video!)

Mr. Flood understands very deeply the difference between seeing something as a camera, and as a human brain does. (Thank you, Mr. Cezanne!)

Perhaps what we all yearn for is Mr. Flood's refreshing penchant to break the magazine/stylist rule of hiding the bad parts of design with safety pins, poor lighting and contorted models. That way, the poison in the mud rises up and it tastes like quinine...luckily, there's this this old codger who says to add some lemon and gin and one can all get drunk while simultaneously curing malaria symptoms! Drink up, knitters!

The codger's credits for the Gin & Tonic drink is in the fine print of in the legalese notice of service you click on before entering the bar site. Anyway, that information is so last year, the codger's got no blog or website and ancient history is NOT on Twitter.

Cheers to Mr. Flood, the bartender! He improved the drink, by the way, with Bombay Sapphire and Canada Dry, served in stunning glassware, so now it's brand, spanking new. I know, because I got the email!

It's on Facebook, so it's real...right?

"Think...then write...then rewrite...THEN publish."
- Mark's bathroom mirror sticky note to himself.

Crafty Andy's picture

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Nobody is saying that he designed it, He never claimed he designed it, but he adapted it to make a throw!

vsidart's picture

Pretty! That would even

Pretty! That would even inspire me to try lace. How did you adapt it to make it baby size/gauged?

Crafty Andy's picture

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The original is a doilie adapted to a n adult throw. The adult throw is done in US 10 or 6 mm, but Flood did the major adaptation with a feather And fan chart. I just drop the needle size and was done with about 8 ounces of yarn.

Crafty Andy's picture

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It came out to be 39 inches ( 1 meter) from point to point.

Bill's picture

Andy...that's beautiful! how

Andy...that's beautiful!
how big is it?
...it looks more like a blanket than a lace doily...which is probably why I like it.