Grafting underarm stitched together (and FO)

purlyman's picture

Okay, so I've been doing this for at least a couple years - knitting sweaters in the round and then grafting the sleeves (also worked in the round) to the body as part of the finishing. The first time I did this there were huge holes on either side of the sleeves where they attached to the body. So ever since then, I've been picking up stitches on either side of the stitches placed on the stitch holder and then grafting them together (using kitchener stitch). Does anyone have a better method? I've just finished off one more baby sweater - this one isn't raglan, the decreases are done evenly every so often. It was inspired by my trip to Iceland.

Comments

ronhuber's picture

The little yoke sweater is

The little yoke sweater is so cute. I do what you do and pick up just one more stitch at the end of each needle. There is still a bit of hole there and then I do what Thomas does. It is quite a critical area and stretches in so many directions.

Thomasknits's picture

When you graft the stitches,

When you graft the stitches, use the ends of the yarn you used for the grafting to close up the hole. Just run the yarn around the stitches around the hole before you work the end in...and pull tight.
-Thomas

purlyman's picture

That sounds sort of like

That sounds sort of like what I've been doing - sounds good!!! Thanks.

albert's picture

I think it might serve you

I think it might serve you well to try knitting a drop-shoulder in the round with steeks, and then picking up the stitches around the armholes after you join the shoulders together. This is the easiest sweater construction I have found. Alternatively, if you don't want to steek, knit in the round from the waistband up to the beginning of the armholes, and then knit the front and backs separately. You would then join the shoulders and pick up the stitches around the armholes and just "charge down the sleeves" as one blogger I have read has put it. Again, this is a very straight forward sweater construction, and once having done it, you will begin to see further possibilities.

purlyman's picture

Hmmm... that does sound like

Hmmm... that does sound like a possibility. I've actually done a chihuahua sweater in that way. I loved the way I was able to pick up stitches at the arm holes and then just knit down. Seems like a good way to make sure you get them long enough. Thanks Albert!

albert's picture

The baby sweater is

The baby sweater is gorgeous- so autumnal! Have you considered branching out from raglans to other methods?

purlyman's picture

Hi Albert - this one's not

Hi Albert - this one's not raglan (or is it?) Do I have the definition wrong in my head? I haven't considered sleeves that you have to sew on because sewing terrifies me!! What suggestions do you have?

albert's picture

Yes, this one looks like a

Yes, this one looks like a yolked vs. raglan, but the idea is similar- just the arrangement of the increases (or decreases as the case may be) differs.