Do you count rounds?

When creating socks, gloves or anything requiring that you make two or more identical pieces do you:

(a) count rounds as you knit using a stitch counter or tick marks on paper?
(b) work until the size is approximately right, then count how many rounds you've done?
(c) use a measuring tape and not worry that you may be off by a round or two?
(d) hold the finished piece next to the one you're working on, again not worrying about having exactly the same number of rounds?
(e) some other method?

My sense of perfectionism demands (a) or (b), but I wonder if maybe I should just relax a little and go for substantially similar rather than identical.  What's your approach?

Stuart

Aaronknits's picture

What a timely

What a timely discussion!!!  As I near completion on the back of my first sweater, I've been kind of up in the air about how anal I want to be about making the pieces match.  I lost count midway through the back piece when I had to "un-knit" a few rows (I'm still blaming that on doggie distractions).  I think once the piece is complete I'm going to count up the rows and then be more diligent about keeping track of them when I work the front piece. 

JPaul's picture

I'm on my third pair of

I'm on my third pair of socks, now.  My process so far has been to knit the leg until I feel like it's a good length judging by a pair of socks I own or the last pair I knit.  The foot I make to fit, so I just knit until it's my size.  But for the second sock, I do end up going back and counting rows on the first so it matches.  I'll knit on the second until I get to the approximate length and then count.  I try not to be too obsessive about it...I can live with it if they're off by a row or two...(but they aren't....hehe).

kiwiknitter's picture

For any 2 identical items

For any 2 identical items such as socks, sleeves and the two sides of the front of a jersey where the collar reductions are made, I knit both at the same time on a circular needle and using 2 different balls of wool.  This gets both done at the same time and ensures equal length.  As for the front and back of a jersey, I use a tape measure and then put the 2 pieces against each other to check for size.

Relaxing and not obsessing about it is a great idea, too!  Knitted woolen fabric is very forgiving and most accomodating.  A quality crafted garment is the goal but if the knitting is no longer fun then it would be better to just go out and purchase the desired garment from a store.

 

I've got knitting fever in the worsted way.

I use a stitch marker &

I use a stitch marker & count the rows as I go according to the pattern. 

Knit away, knit away