ok so here's my 1st post

joeyune's picture

Hey guys, ok so this crochet guy finally bought some needles and learned to knit.

ok so now to my dilemma, i have some cool little charts i found and reworked for my self, basically altering colors to my liking and what have you, the problem is they are just grids now with color block placement. i'm most likely going to use the stocking stitch for what i'm making. how do i traslate my chart into this? (my chart is an argyle pattern)

thanks in advance :)

Comments

HuskerChub's picture

O.K. we need a little more

O.K. we need a little more information to get you on the right path.

1. Are these large blocks of color? Is it a "picture" type of design? Or is it like 1-3 sts of one color then 1-4 sts of a second color followed by more of the 1st color? Depending on the answer to this question we can decide what technique you will need to be working in...fair isle or intarsia.

As MMario asked, were the original charts designed for knitting? If the charts were designed for something like cross stitch (square grid) and you want to convert them to knitting you will need graph paper that is proportional to knitting stitches (rectangles NOT squares) or the pattern will turn out very tall and skinny...think of a fun house mirror. This is MUCH more critical in intarsia knitting than fair isle so we need to know what the charts look like. more like this....http://sweaterscapes.com/pillow1.htm or like this...http://knittingincolor.blogspot.com/2006/02/margene-asked-me-to-do-blog-entry.html

Let us know and we'll get you headed in the right direction.
Shawn

joeyune's picture

ok so here is a link to a

ok so here is a link to a pic from the site i got the chart from showing a semi finished product http://scrubberbum.typepad.com/./photos/uncategorized/finishedseam.jpg (this pic is from a blog on the page about how to knit and argyle sock but they fail to actually give you the knittin directions they only give you the sewing and assembly of the sock)
and its not socks i'm trying to make i like the pattern and would like to make some kind of scarf or maybe a vest too.

and here is the pattern i got from the same site http://scrubberbum.typepad.com/moth_heaven/files/c__docume1_w_locals1_temp_plugtmp_arrrgyle.pdf

and yes they have the chart more like squares and i know the stitches when knitted wont look so full and will have a more vertical compression to it

HuskerChub's picture

The pics that you are

The pics that you are referencing are argyle so the main colors would be knit using the intarsia technique, the single stitches of color that form the diagonal lines could either be knit in or duplicate stitched in after the fact. One way you have more bobbins to deal with but as finished when you are done knitting, the other allows you to knit with less "clutter" but have hand work to do after the fact...knitters choice, IMHO.
Here are a couple of places to begin your intarsia education.

http://sweaterscapes.com/intars.htm
http://vickidesigns.homestead.com/Intarsia.html

If you need help, ask, someone will help you out, promise!

Shawn

garyhrx's picture

Controversial people are

Controversial people are special people and I am a VERY special person.

It is time consuming but since I hate charts I try to reduce all the instructions to standard knitting abbreviations. Then I intensely study the instructions until I can find a pattern or "motif" to the design. Charts just do not work for me. If you take the time to write out the directions you will always have it. THe other advantage is that by manipulating that data I find that I get a much better sense of knitting in general.

joeyune's picture

if there were written

if there were written instructions i wouldn't have that much of a problem the problem is its just a chart image for knitting like a graph. so this is where im confused on what to do

MMario's picture

Were the charts knitting

Were the charts knitting charts to begin with? (that's a question which effects proportions)

Are you going to be knitting in the round or back and forth?

(effects *how* you translate the chart to stitches.

MMario - I'm not divorced from reality - we're having a trial separation
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MMarioKKnits/

joeyune's picture

the pattern was a knitting

the pattern was a knitting pattern to begin with but since i wasn't knitting at that time i used it for crochet using the afghan stitch technic which looks like a stocking stitch in knitting only problem there is that the outcome is thick and curls badly. but since i purchased some knitting needles i figured i'd use the charts for knitting like intended but there were no written instructions just the graphed image and i will be knitting as a flat panel or back and forth

MMario's picture

The "simple" answer is that

The "simple" answer is that you will read your graph from right to left, knitting each color as indicated as you go across the row; then PURL the next row - from LEFT to RIGHT... repeating this secquence as you work your way UP the chart.

The more complex and useful answer depends on what techniques you are going to need for the colorwork - I haven't looked at the graph yet.

Stockinette, like the afghan stitch, curls - but for a scarf you could add a garter stitch border (a few stitches on either end of every row that you ALWAYS knit - whether on a "purl" row or a "knit" row)

MMario - I'm not divorced from reality - we're having a trial separation
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MMarioKKnits/