Two Questions

Raymiew's picture

I'm almost finished with my baby blanket. I have 6 rows to finish. (make it happen soon please make it happen soon)

Anyway I want to try my hand a knitting a sweater next. First question is what is an easy pattern to start with? I've been looking at the Lion Brand Custom Classic Pullover http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/custom-classic-pullover . It looks simple but I've never made a sweater before so I can't tell. Also I was thinking of doing it with KnitPicks Wool of the Andes. (something cheap since I figure it will have plenty of flaws).

Second Question - my grandmother wrote a pattern for an afghan that contains different squares of antique things (an old iron, spinning wheel, etc.) It was pretty simple white background and black pattern. I can remember her writing it out on graph paper. When she died it went to one of her kids who has since died and I think it has been lost. However, she made me an afghan from the pattern, and I was wondering how hard it would be to sit down and figure out the blocks from the actual afghan? I haven't had it out in years, so I can't remember exactly what it looks like, but I think it's all stockinette. She was a perfectionist so I know it doesn't have any mistakes in the actual knitting. I've seen her get almost finished with a project and realize on row 5 she made a mistake and rip it all back and start over. (I, on the other hand, bitch and moan if I have to go back 5 stitches to fix a mistake)

Comments

ksmarguy's picture

That afghan sounds

That afghan sounds beautiful...unfortunately I would be no help in the matter :) I like Ron's suggestion with the graph paper and pencil.

As far as the sweater...just jump right in. I had just done a scarf and I went into my LYS and told the lady that I needed something to do that was more than just a simple scarf and she said..."Do a sweater" She helped me pick one out that was free on the internet, showed me the yarns and off I went. I am still working on it because I keep picking up other projects in the meantime, but I love the pattern, it is beautiful, it varies a bit, but it is still fairly simple. I say just jump in and do it. I know that there are a few mistakes on my sweater, but I will wear them proudly and I can tell a difference in my knitting from the beginning back where I started to the end of the first sleeve that I just cast off last weekend. So don't be afraid, just make sure that you like the pattern...even if it looks too intricate or difficult, but you love it, do it. do a practice swatch to get used to the pattern and then it will be easy when you do the sweater. And Ron is RIGHT!!! CHECK GAUGE!!!!! VERY IMPORTANT!!!!!!! and if you have a patterned sweater, you might check gage in pattern (my sweater pattern said to do it and I am glad that I did) so just follow the instructions and remember how many guys on here or ravelry will help you out if you geet stuck. Good Luck and Happy Knitting!

ronhuber's picture

I don't think the pattern

I don't think the pattern makes much difference. All sweaters are composed of knit and in some cases purl stitches. Find a friendly owner or worker at your LYS and ask for suitable yarns. They should stock yarn in all price ranges and if you buy from them they will help you if you run into problems. The big questions are do you like the style and can you achieve the gauge stated in the pattern. The latter is very difficult. For example, if the pattern is written for a gauge of 20 stitches per 4 inches and the best you can do is l9.5 stitches or 21, you will have to rewrite the pattern. I know too many people who quit knitting because their first sweaters turned out to be too big or too small and they were never worn. Borrow a copy of "Knitting Without Tears" by Elizabeth Zimmermann and see if her style of designing would suit you. Don't be afraid to run a length of cotton yarn through the stitches, take them off and try the sweater on as you go.
For the afghan, get some graph paper and count the number of stitches and rows in each square of the afghan. Then fill in the squares that are black. Use a magnifying glass if you have to. Then get a book on two colour knitting and follow the pattern you made. It should be quite easy if only two colours were used.