Increasing, Decreasing, and Frogging

stillday's picture

This week I started to learn about increasing and decreasing using YO and K2Tog. The YO was pretty straightforward, but the K2Tog was swift to punish me for knitting too tightly. My hand started to go numb after a while.

For practice, I cast on 22 stitches onto size 9 bamboo needles (I wanted to see what bamboo felt like....definately not as slick as my Addi circs, but the lightness and warmth of the wood does feel nice). The pattern I'm working is called "Feather and Fan" or "Old Shale."

After row 4 of the 2nd repeat, I noticed I now had 23 stitches instead of 22. Hmmm. I couldn't figure out where I picked up the extra stitch, and my guru/wife was busy reorganizing her stash. So I learned another new skill...frogging. I frogged the whole thing and started over, and so far it's looking o.k. If the yarn holds out it will probably be a scarf.

Frogging was so much fun that I frogged my garter stitch scarf too. There were quite a few dropped stitches early on that I ignored, and the 60 stitches I had cast on made the scarf wider than I wanted. Then when I learned to purl and threw in a mix of seed and moss stitch that really didn't do much either. So off to the frog pond it went.

I cast on 35 stitches and will keep the project as simple garter stitch scarf. Yes, you counted right. I now have (sigh...) 3 WIPs.

Comments

Aaronknits's picture

Ah yes, feather and fan!

Ah yes, feather and fan! I'm working on a wrap/stole in this very same pattern. I haven't had to frog any of it, but I have had to tink back on the one row of actual pattern stitches on more than one occasion. It is "easy peasy" as Mario would say. Which is why I chose it. Not much to remember as far as the pattern rows go. I can certainly see where it would be a great project for someone who wants to practice YO and K2TOG. Can't wait to see yours!

scottly's picture

I have froged too rashly in

I have froged too rashly in the past. I find that if I let something sit over night rather then frog it in the frustration of the moment I can sometimes fix the problem or that there really wasn't a problem - it was just tired eyes seeing a mistake where ther wasn't one. On the other hand I also learned not to beat a dead horse some things just can't be fixed. There is something liberating abbout frogging though, frequently those little mistakes can feel like an albatross around your neck.

Scott

I wish I were knitting now.

purlyman's picture

I also agree that frogging

I also agree that frogging is a very good thing! I'm currently working on a sweater (Cobblestone) with yarn from a sweater I finished last year. It didn't look or feel right, so I frogged the whole thing and am starting anew. Sometimes if I don't have a particular project or can't think of what to do, I'll just knit and frog and repeat.

stillday's picture

I've heard stories of

I've heard stories of British WWII POWs that would use the frog and repeat method to help keep their sanity in the camps.

albert's picture

"Sometimes if I don't have a

"Sometimes if I don't have a particular project or can't think of what to do, I'll just knit and frog and repeat. "

Yipes! When this urge overcomes you, simply take an empty two-litre plastic soda bottle and whack yourself repeatedly over the head until it passes.

BuduR's picture

If the urge is strong, I

If the urge is strong, I suggest a mini keg or even a bat of the baseball variety will work.
MWK's Token Estrogen-American

purlyman's picture

Hey Albert, doesn't happen

Hey Albert, doesn't happen often and it doesn't usually last very long. I'll have an empty two-litre bottle when I finish my next gin & tonic.

albert's picture

A two litre bottle of gin?

A two litre bottle of gin? I'm impressed.

MMario's picture

A mild case of startitis -

A mild case of startitis - most people suffer from it at one point or another. But many of us just go with the flow and cast on until there are no needles available - then buy more needles! *grin*

MMario

QueerJoe's picture

I was so glad to read that

I was so glad to read that someone consider frogging to be a valuable skill. I would even extend that comment to say that knowing when to frog and when not to is also valuable.

I am a big fan of how you're approaching knitting...very analytical...not afraid to try something, or experiment.

Your wife seems to have taught you well.