The Boston Globe - "Look Who's Knitting"

purlyman's picture

LOOK WHO'S KNITTING - NO LONGER AFRAID TO ADMIT IT, MEN ARE TAKING UP NEEDLES AND YARN
Boston Globe, The (MA)
January 31, 2002
Linda Matchan, Globe Staff
Section: Life At Home
Page: H1

When Ira Vishner's mother died two years ago, she left an unfinished sweater she'd been knitting for Vishner's wife. Being a practical man, Vishner, a Brookline consultant, did the logical thing. ''It was there and needed to be finished,'' he said. So he learned how to knit , and finished it himself. Men who knit. It has the comical ring of a one-liner, like, say, grandmas who parasail. Although men and women have been crossing each other's gender lines for years, knitting for the most part has remained a stubbornly segregated activity. Women knit sweaters. Men get to wear them. This seems to be less true than ever now. The roster of men who knit includes no less macho a male than Ethan Zohn, winner of the third edition of CBS's ''Survivor: Africa.'' He was shown knitting on the Survivor recap special two weeks ago. Network TV honcho Stu Bloomberg reportedly took up knitting during vacations on the Massachusetts coast. (He may well be knitting more than ever now, since being removed from his job earlier this month as the head of ABC's entertainment division.) Two local yarn shops, A Good Yarn in Brookline and Woolcott & Co. in Cambridge, run knitting classes taught by men. Men are showing up at knitting circles (or ''stitch and bitch'' sessions, in knitting vernacular). Teenaged boys are knitting, boys such as Michael Godin of Leominster, who will turn 16 next week. TAUGHT BY HIS MOTHER, HE KNITS FOR HIMSELF, HIS CHURCH, HIS COUSINS, AND HAS ALSO CROCHETED AFGHANS TO DONATE TO ROMANIAN ORPHANS. HE USED TO FEEL SELF-CONSCIOUS ABOUT KNITTING, HE SAYS, BUT NOT ANYMORE. ``I SAW (ETHAN ZOHN KNITTING) ON `SURVIVOR,' '' HE SAYS. ``THAT WAS SORT OF, LIKE, REASSURING.'' Conclusion: There are "tons" of men who knit, states Niki Bronstein, owner of Woolcott & Co. in a telephone interview. "I can think of probably 10 right off the bat. As a matter of fact, there's a man in my store right now."

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Comments

crmartin's picture

History repeating itself?

History repeating itself? George Sands would be classified as a modern woman in the present. I think men and women are just getting to the point where they are going to do what they want and not worry about what someone may think. I find this especially true in the younger generation;post baby boomer.

Randy

MMario's picture

Now if they would just

Now if they would just report that men are RECLAIMING knitting - rather then act like men who knit are the social equivilant of George Sands in her time....or worse, treating male knitters like circus animals.

MMario - ambiguity is cultivated, it doesn't happen in a vacuum!

BuduR's picture

*Puts away the whip and

*Puts away the whip and flaming hoop*

MMario's picture

oh rats - just when you were

oh rats - just when you were getting me all excited!

MMario - ambiguity is cultivated, it doesn't happen in a vacuum!

BuduR's picture

LOL yeah I'm a tease :/

LOL yeah I'm a tease :/

purlyman's picture

You're right. I like your

You're right. I like your new picture by the way. There was a followup to this article that I'll post soon. Apparently the reporter got lots of phone calls so she wrote again the next week. We'll see what it says!