Patterns

 Hi Guys & ladylurkers

Can anyone tell me why sweaters are designed in 2 pieces? Why are they not made in a circle? My daughter saw the Knit:1 magazine & was amused by the centrefold but spied the sweater with the mega, removable cowl collar of pages 58 & 59. It calls for the front and back to be knit in 2 pieces but the same pattern. Will it make any difference if I make it in one piece? I'm not a designer so not sure if it will affect the look. I do realise that I will have to careful about the armholes but that's what stitch markers arre for surely.
Thank you in advance.
Martin 

seamed sweaters tend to hold

seamed sweaters tend to hold their shape better after extended wear.  they are unlikely to stretch out and become baggy.  but knitting in the round is so much easier and more enjoyable (much less annoying to finish).

 

ulf's picture

It doesn´t matter if you

It doesn´t matter if you knit one round piece or two pieses as long as you leave out one stitche on each side what usually are for sewing the pieses together. But sometimes when knitting with two coulors or more you don´t want every thread  to follow the row around. In that case it´s easier to knit two pieses. As a matter of fact you can knit the sweater as a tube and after sew two seams on a sewingmachin on each side and take a sissor and cut the armholes open between the seames. You can do the same with the neckline. But that can not be done on cut-in sleeves. That is the traditional way of knitting and sewing norwegian sweaters.

Gabriel's picture

The sweater I am knitting

The sweater I am knitting for my partner is in the round......and I know of many that are both. Simon is braver than I.....me scared to screw with pattern!!! LOL I'm sure you will do great with it. Keep us posted!

Hi Martin.I always convert

Hi Martin.

I always convert patterns to round knitting but you do have to divide at the arm-holes and continue in the usual way unless you're Scottish and create a 'steek' like they do for Fair-Isle sweaters.  It's difficult to explain this technique and it's safer to look it up! but it involves either working upto the neck and cutting (!) or winding the wool and creating a ladder - believe me, it's easier to divide!

I always add two stitches as a seam stitch.  These are purled in every round and mark what would be the seam-line. When knitting in the round, and working from a pattern chart,  you must remember to purl the knit stitches every other round to keep the pattern correct and all cable patterns must be in even numbers.

If you have a look at the Guernsey images I posted, they are knitted seamless; with the sleaves picked up from the body and knitted down to the cuff. 

Once you've done it, you'll find it much quicker since the purling is more awkward and time consuming.  Give it a try...

 

Simon