Wha...?

YugiDean's picture

So I've started my second "in the round" project and have already hit a snag (no pun intended). One particular stitch on the chart is perplexing me and several of my knitting "advisors." It says to first knit from the front and back of the next stitch, then to take "the vertical strand running downwards between these two stitches just made, twist and knit this picked-up stitch." HUH? Several of the local experts were even confused by this wording and ultimately decided that it just meant to knit from the front, knit from the back, and then knit from the front again. But...why wouldn't it just word it that way? I dunno what to make of it, and even though they seemed certain that the k1f k1b k1f method was what it meant, or at least a way to make three stitches that wouldn't affect the pattern, I'm not completely convinced....any ideas on this?

Comments

technocowboy's picture

This one baffled me for a

This one baffled me for a long time, until a very good friend taught me the easiest way to find that bar. If you knit into the back stitch first and then into the front, finding the bar between them is SO much easier. Well, it did for me on the Celtic Cap.

MMario's picture

I've seen this double

I've seen this double increase before - I don't remember in what pattern - something I downloaded, not from a book...But I just used [k,yo,k] in the same stitch instead ; much faster.
MMario - Can anybody tell me what year it is?

drmel94's picture

Well, not having anything in

Well, not having anything in front of me to try to figure this out, I'm not certain if I'm visualizing this properly, but it seems to me that all it wants you to do is a double increase into one stitch. k1f, k1b is commonly referred to as a bar increase, because it leaves a horizontal bar once the stitches are slipped over to the right needle. Is it possible that the "vertical strand" is this bar before it's slipped off the left needle? If that's the case, then it sounds as though you're to put an extra twist in it before you make that second increase stitch. I'm not so sure, though, that it would make a huge difference in the appearance of the stitch if you didn't do that, or even if you did a different double increase, such as k1, p1, k1 into the same stitch.