Blocking and stuff

Okay... let me preface by saying that I hate blocking. Knitting I like. But the thought of dealing with all those little pins makes me cringe. Invariably some of them will find their way to the carpet in an attempt to attack my unsuspecting feet like a very pissed off rattlesnake but without the warning.

So... because of this, I decided to get a little more crafty and made a blocking frame using the instructions from KnitPicks. The thing is huge. It's a 6' square with 1' legs... so 6'x7' total. You can make a smaller one of course with very little math effort, but I wanted the full size deal since I'll be blocking shawls and such. Pictures are attached if you wanna take a look.

I plan on doing is getting a set of blocking wires to use with it. That should help in keeping the tension even along the straight edges. I haven't had a chance to string anything up on it yet, but I'm looking forward to it. From what I hear, when you get used to doing it, blocking goes much faster. That's what I'm hoping.

So do any of you guys have experience using a blocking frame and have any tips?

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Comments

Parrot's picture

Hey, Kenny . . WOW . that

Hey, Kenny . .

WOW . that frame looks great! It's so large it looks like you are starting an addition to your home . . LOL I know you will enjoy the challenge of learning to use it and will have a greater feeling when you get wonderful blocking results after working so hard on the shawls.

Will be in touch soon . .

Doug

Tallguy's picture

That's a great looking

That's a great looking frame! It will work really fine.

However, I don't know if I should tell you that blocking like that is going to be tedious -- the results will be well worth it though! If you are going to be knitting lace shawls, there is no other way to do it. You should know, as well, that you will only do this once on each shawl, since most people don't normally wash their shawls that often. If it needs cleaning, they should be instructed to return it to you -- so that you can do it properly, and then stretch it properly too. You would hate to see them ruin it by throwing it into the machine and dryer!!

I agree that blocking wires are good for straight edges. You can also get some wires that are flexible, and are perfect for curves or strange angles. They are well worth investing in a set of them.

To block lace takes time, but don't worry about it. If you wanted something fast, you would make dishcloths! LOL This is just part of the whole process.

Thanks for the comments

Thanks for the comments Tall.

I have no delusions that blocking on the frame is going to be anything but a challenge. But I can only think that it has to be better than pinning, unpinning and repinning all the scalloped points on those lace projects to make them look right. *shudder* We'll see when I block something on it the first time. Once I get some straight blocking wires I'll block the Candle Flame shawl I finished a few weeks ago. It's rectangular so it will be a good first attempt at blocking on the frame.

I agree about the flexible blocking wires too. I've actually got the blocking wire set from KnitPicks (can you tell I love that site?) in my cart already. It comes with both straight and flexible wires.

Kenny

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