Wallet

Celowin's picture

I've been lurking around for a few weeks, and I suppose now is as good a time as any to start contributing to the interesting community here.

My first knitting project was the wallet from Michael del Vecchio's "Knitting with Balls." I learned a lot from working through it, but about halfway through, I came to a realization: even if I did everything completely perfectly, I would never actually use the wallet I was working on.

The problem was simple. The wallet design was too basic. There are features that I like to have in a wallet that the del Vecchio pattern just didn't have. I like to have tiered credit card pockets, so I can see what I'm reaching for. The del Vecchio wallet seemed too tall and too narrow for my tastes. Finally, I figured that if I were going to go through the trouble to knit up something like this, I'd want to show it
off a bit, and so I wanted an id-card window to force the wallet into shopkeepers' hands when they ask to see identification.

After considering it for a bit, I decided to bite the bullet and jump into the world of design. I know that most people don't design anything until after they actually know what they are doing, but I try not to let
insignificant details like that get to me. After all, I figure that the worst that could happen is that I lose an eye, and that is only if I try to do ExTreme! knitting without wearing the proper eye protection.

I had to make a few concessions to physics. I would have liked more credit card pockets, but it would have given the wallet too many layers and made it far too thick. Even as it is the wallet is a bit too bulky
for my tastes, but I'm willing to accept the compromise.

The thing isn't perfect, but all in all I'm happy with it. By trying to do design work rather than just parroting instructions, I feel that I understand the techniques a little bit better.

My plan as I learn more is to continue to dabble in design as I learn more of the basics. Every time I do a project, I want to be thinking, "what can I do to improve this?"

Unfortunately, I can't share a photo of the wallet, since I don't as yet have a digital camera. Once Uncle Sam pays back the interest-free loan I've given him over the course of this past year, I'll probably invest in one.

Instead, later tonight I'll try to type up my notes so that anyone interested can see what I did. Don't expect much, as after all I am still a raw beginner, but I hope that at least it will be entertaining to some of the folks here.

Comments

grandcarriage's picture

I find some of his patterns

I find some of his patterns a little "wonky". Kind of "what was he thinking". I have to admit, the idea of a cotton wallet. I dunno about you, but I've stood up at the pot to have my wallet catch on the lip and go flipping into the bowl. Leather wipes right off, isn't immediately absorbent, protects the insides. I don't think a cotton wallet would do the same. EWWWWWW.

I do like the jeans sweater with the henley neck and cuffs (that is pictured worn backwards on the cover....you notice that?)

Good luck with your absorbent wallet. Careful around those "loos".
Not tonight honey: I'm knitting...

Celowin's picture

I actually like that his

I actually like that his patterns are wonky. I'm attracted to the act of creation rather than the finished product, so I like that the author thought outside the box a bit.

As for the loo, I agree that dropping a cotton wallet in would be more than a little unpleasant. On the other hand, the cotton wallet grips the pocket better and is less likely to slip out than a leather one. I don't think that I'll be using it as a full time wallet, but it is an interesting change of pace once in awhile and a great conversation starter.

I did notice that the cover sweater seemed to be made of the same yarn as the boot cut one, but I didn't think that it was the exact sweater worn backwards!

Good for you! I always

Good for you! I always consider the pattern a suggestion and modify it to suit my needs. Usually it works out, sometimes it doesn't, but you can always rip out your work and start over if it doesn't turn out the way you planned.

Celowin's picture

Thanks for the

Thanks for the encouragement!

I'm no stranger to ripping -- I figure it is all a part of experimenting. Some ideas will work, and others just won't pan out at all.

I've posted the pattern in the "Projects" forum for anyone that wants to look.

http://www.menwhoknit.com/node/2049