Too Tight On The Needle

MasonM's picture

I am working on my first project. It's just a simple garter stitch scarf using super bulky yarn and US size 17 needles.

Whether on this project or on my practice piece (medium worsted on US size 10 needles), the loops on the needle get tight and it's hard to slide the piece along the needle or to work the right needle into the loop to make the next knit stitch..

What am I doing wrong here?

kevyoga1970's picture

Hi guy--Make sure you are

Hi guy--Make sure you are knitting into the front of the stitch and not the back. Consistently knitting into the back twists all the stitches which makes them very tight. I quit knitting twice because my knitting was so tight. Then I realized I was going through the back and not the front.

Kevin

MasonM's picture

I'm not entirely sure what

I'm not entirely sure what you mean by going through the back.

I watched Amy's video on the knit and purl stitches on knittinghelp.com and am doing the stitch the way she shows it.

Now that I am focusing on making sure to form the stitches on the body of the needle, looser grip, and not pulling the stitch tight (didn't even know I was doing that) it's going much easier.

Mason

Linux: because a PC is a terrible thing to waste

And, to echo Mario's Death

And, to echo Mario's Death Grip Comment:

Don't forget to keep breathing!

~Mike

आदि लक्ष्मी
Yahoo Id: stickywarp2001

MasonM's picture

LOL Mason Linux: because a

LOL

Mason

Linux: because a PC is a terrible thing to waste

MMario's picture

oh heck, it's just a scarf -

oh heck, it's just a scarf - he can probably manage with a breath at the end of every row...

[s'truth - when a stitch gets tricky for some reason - such as the yarn threatening to split or drop, etc; or you are counting, sometimes; don't you find yourself holding your breath? I do! Usually notice it when the tunnel vision begins :)]

MasonM's picture

Thanks MMario; Bingo, I

Thanks MMario;

Bingo, I think I have been forming a lot of the stitches around the point instead of the shaft. I'm working on a losser grip and I'll try and pay more attention to where I am forming the stitches to see if that helps.

I do know that it is going very slowly because of the tightness of the loops.

I appreciate the input.

Mason

Linux: because a PC is a terrible thing to waste

MMario's picture

It's a feedback thing; you

It's a feedback thing; you form the stitch around the tip of the needle, which makes it tight, then when you go to knit it it's so tight you don't insert the needle far enough so you form the stitch around the tip of the needle.....

I do this sort of little "roll" of the needle as I take the stitch off, which helps make all my stitchs uniform. it isn't much, mostly just always positioning the needles to the same point relative to each other as I take the stitch off .

MasonM's picture

That pretty well describes

That pretty well describes what I was doing. I just knitted a few rows while focusing on making sure to form the stitches up on the needle body. It made a world of difference. Thanks for bringing it to my attention.

Mason

Linux: because a PC is a terrible thing to waste

MMario's picture

probably your just pulling

probably your just pulling things too tight (it goes along with the "beginner death grip" on the needles); how well I remember - the first scarf I did was about 1/2 the width of the second - though knit in the same yarn with the same needles in the same stitch. I loosened up on my tension - made the knitting go much faster and my hands stopped hurting.

the other most likely possibility is that you are forming the stitches around the points of the needle - they should form around the shaft, where the needle is wider.

MMario - I don't live in the 21st Century - but I sometimes play a character who does.