making yarn go the extra mile

kylewilliam's picture

I finished a sleeve of my mom's sweater - have the right front and one more sleeve to go (finished the back and left front and one arm)and 5 balls of yarn left - (they had 15 and it called for 15) - I'm praying hard that I have enough of this color - there is no more of this dye lot; I bought all they had and it's the PERFECT "mom" color - I know that I can knit a row with the exact color, change yarn and purl back with the same color (different dye lot) when doing SS - has anyone done this before? I'm worried that it might show up - I am thinking that even though I might have enough yarn I may do this with the other sleeve - just to try as a little insurance policy - I'll do the right front first (all with good yarn) and then I'll do the last arm in this technique and pray a lot that it works -

does anyone have any suggestions on how to make yarn go further if you think you might be running out? (besides making sure there's extra yarn?) haha

thanks for everyone's input and comments - it definately helps!

Comments

ronhuber's picture

I think you will have

I think you will have enough. The front usually takes up a third, as does the back and the sleeves. Therefore, one sleeve is equal to one front section. You have done two thirds of the sweater and have a third left to knit with a third of the wool. Right on!!!!

grandcarriage's picture

Kyle, I am going to make you

Kyle, I am going to make you very happy, I have a technique for you: Although I usually do back and front panels first and then work on the sleeves at the same time, incase this happens: The technique is called "Chasse" French for "Chase" cause one yarn chases the other. You need circular needles. Directions: Knit row in original yarn, slide the knitting back to the other needle and knit next row with the odd dye lot yarn (You will have just knit two consecutive rows, looking at the "right side" of the fabric. Be careful not to twist stitches: you might have to knit through the back to accomplish this). Flip the knitting over (as usual) wrap the first yarn around the second, one full wrap.(this keeps the side from pulling)and purl across with the first yarn. Shift all the knitting back to the other side again, and purl with the second yarn. Easy peasey. Continue till done. 1 row of each blends pretty well. You might have to get a little creative with the sleeve decreases, but that's easy as well. Let me know how it goes

MMario's picture

Back and one sleeve took 10

Back and one sleeve took 10 balls out of 15? you ain't gonna make it through a front and another sleeve on half that!!!!

MMario - I don't live in the 21st Century - but I sometimes play a character who does.

kylewilliam's picture

the back (full), one side of

the back (full), one side of the front (it's another cardigan) and one sleeve took 10 balls - I have 4 and a piece left...

I'm nervous; it'll be close but I think by stretching out the yarn with another ball and doing the alternating thing it'll be OK...

MMario's picture

That sounds a bit better

That sounds a bit better

kiwiknitter's picture

If I remember correctly,

If I remember correctly, isn't the rule of thumb that the back and front take twice the sleeve amount? I have found this to be true for my jumpers, at least. Sleeves usually are 2.5 balls each and the back and front take 10.

My knitting is totally tubular!

kiwiknitter's picture

I have done the alternating

I have done the alternating dye lot trick and it worked fine and was not visible.

If it looks like I'm going to run out of wool for some reason (the wool was given to me), I start to think of different strategies such as making the garment into a sleeveless vest, adding another colour somehow (eg a stripe), etc. But, I always purchase extra skeins of wool. The price invested in a skein or two sitting unused in the left-overs box is worth the price.

My knitting is totally tubular!