Looking for a sweater vest pattern

CLABBERS's picture

Hello guys,
I am looking for a men's sweater vest pattern that is done on circular needles and is all one piece. Does anyone know of any such pattern that I could get for free or buy? Maybe someone has seen one in a book? I would like to keep the pattern fairly simple in terms of types of stitches. I have recently gotten that hang of doing cable stitches, so that would work on a sweater vest.
Thanks!
Mark

Comments

potterdc's picture

Hi Mark, I went to Ravelry

Hi Mark,

I went to Ravelry and did a search for vests, then narrowed it down by using the tools on the left hand side to filter. Trying to find "circular" or "seamless" was tricky, but I finally found them under "attributes" as "seamless" and "worked in the round." I came up with 9 patterns - so, not an overwhelming choice, but among them were Jared Flood's "Alberta" and "Humphrey," mentioned by James, below. I also found the Glen Moir Vest that has a very cool cable design.

kiwiknitter's picture

In the past, I've taken a

In the past, I've taken a vest pattern which is for flat knitting and just converted it to seamless by knitting both the front and the back one after another. When I was at the arm holes, it was easy to make a steek and to do the decreases called for in the pattern (the same for the neck). I hope this is understandable. My point is that it is simple to do.

Never trust a man who, when left alone in a room with a tea cozy, doesn't try it on.  ~Billy Connolly

gardenguy42's picture

You might want to take a

You might want to take a look at Meg Swansen's "Shawl-Collared Vest" and "Double V" vest as well. They are both knit in the round and then steeked. They both have lovely yet simple cable patterns also. The pattern for the Shawl-Collared Vest is in her book "Handknitting" by Meg Swansen and is also available at Schoolhouse Press, as is an instructional DVD and a kit, as is the Double V.

Good luck!

"You must be the change you wish to see in the world." -- Mahatma Gandhi

PeterMark's picture

I've got one I was working

I've got one I was working on and then put aside for another day. It's from the book "Men Who Knit and the Dogs Who Love Them." It's a very interesting pattern with lots of cables. I freak out when I get to the arm holes and I put it aside .....

2manyhobbies's picture

I have a free one I have my

I have a free one I have my eye on but haven't knitted:
http://gosyo.co.jp/english/pattern/eHTML/ePDF/1008/3w/29-210-51_Henley_Vest.pdf

The pattern is written for one size only (42" chest), so you would need to adjust width by the 5-st repeat to get your desired width.

Joe-in Wyoming's picture

Steeking is one way to do

Steeking is one way to do it...but I'm also afraid of scissors and knitted fabric coming together. The one vest I knit was bottom up and working the back and two fronts separately, then joining at the shoulder seams. Lots of luck. -- Books, knitting, cats, fountain pens...Life is Good.

james's picture

I used a pattern on

I used a pattern on Knitty.com called Humphrey. It's very simple. I used it as a jumping off point and made a bunch of modifications to turn it into what I wanted. You might look it over. It's free! :-)

http://www.knitty.com/ISSUEdf10/KSPATThumphrey.php

KNIT ONE, KNIT ALL, by

KNIT ONE, KNIT ALL, by Elizabeth Zimmerman has 5 or 6 vest patterns in all garter stitch. Lots of other stuff in that book---maybe pick and choose and devise your own pattern. Steeking is a process much used and enjoyed by many persons and SCARES THE LIVING HELL out of me.

The Fair Isle sweater vests

The Fair Isle sweater vests I have made have all been on circular needles for almost their entirety. You steek the armholes and neck opening and then cut them open with scissors, then pick up stitches for the bands. If you've never cut your knitting before, it can be intimidating, but it works; it also means not having to purl unless it's part of the patterning. I have also made vests with circular needles up to the bottom of the armholes and then started working back and forth on the chest and back, and finally joining at the shoulder tops. Check Alice Starmore's book on Fair Isle knitting for vest and sweater construction.

Char