Self Rewards

AKQGuy's picture

I finished the dang socks! Once again, so all may hear me. I hate ribbing! I don't know why, I just find it tedious. Okay, maybe hate is too strong a word. I dislike ribbing greatly? I'm sure I'll get over it. Anyway, while waiting for Bob's parent to arrive for dinner last night I cast off the last one. Then I started working on a Koolhaas baby hat that has been patiently waiting for my attention again. And of course, because I found it so tedious that I started socks instead of finishing it the first time I have shoved it in the UFO bin again and pulled out a fresh unused skein.

Heehee. I feel so naughty. But hey, I deserve some self reward. I finished the damn socks! Anyway, it's a new shawlette thingy(Pic1) that I was working on in another purply yarn that I just wasn't digging so I frogg'd that and put it away for another more appropriate future project. Probably something for my niece for Christmas.

Getting ready for bed last night I walked into this scene in the bed room (Pic2). You're probably thinking, "So what?" But if you knew the queen there in the middle you would wonder, "Why in the hell does she have a bone?" You see, Shiela would have been an awesome Hyena. She could beg food off an Ethiopian, and she will eat practically anything handed to her, but has no drive to touch either toys or bones. There's simply not enough calories for her. While I was brushing my teeth I did hear a little to do in the bedroom and my guess is that the Sullivan and Tucker dogs were goofing off with the bone and she took it from them and separated them to the their corners so she could get some proper sleep. And kept the bone for good measure. Just my guess. Someone has to be the adult in the house.

So, I have a question for all of you. I now have a blog on blogger, and I was curious if there was a way for me to pull my psoted photos directly over using the http addy? Let me know if you know.

Anyway, me and this miserable summer cold are going to go to bed in a vain attempt to get some rest like the Sullivan here (pic3). Of course I'd snore like the Passamaquoddy Lighthouse foghorn.

AttachmentSize
5.30.2011 post 3.jpg45.21 KB
5.30.2011 post 2.jpg30.52 KB
5.30.2011 post 4.jpg62.49 KB

Comments

QueerJoe's picture

I can't help you with the

I can't help you with the ribbing...I know how to knit/purl Continental style, but I don't like my gauge as well.

But I can answer your Blogger question.

If you go in an Edit the blog entry with the photo and click on the HTML tab, you can just copy the entire thing into your post here (I think...I'm going to try and post the photo of my socks from my latest QueerJoe blog entry below...if it looks like gobbly gook, it doesn't work...if you see a photo, that's how I did it)...I hope this is what you were trying to do:

AKQGuy's picture

I appreciate it and will

I appreciate it and will play with it some. Thanks for the info!

bobinthebul's picture

I think for ribbing,

I think for ribbing, round-the-neck is only slightly less of a pain than in English, with Continental being the easiest, especially if you keep your yarn finger low. In Portuguese you still have to move the working yarn to the left or right before doing the stitch. But for two-color work, working from the purlside, it's great.

mwkbloom's picture

I highly recommend the

I highly recommend the uncrossed method when doing ribbing. I barely notice moving the yarn between the needles between stitches.

Joe-in Wyoming's picture

I'm glad you persevered on

I'm glad you persevered on the ribbing. Those are nice socks. I remember that yarn for the newest project...very nice, indeed. And I can't blame Sheila for separating the two bandits...she needs her rest - and to show she's the ruler of the pack. As for purling...have I ever shown you how I do the switch from knit to purl with Continental? For me, it makes it only a flick of my finger to go back and forth. It definitely makes it faster to work ribbing, in my case. -- Books, knitting, cats, fountain pens...Life is Good.

kiwiknitter's picture

I'm not fond of ribbing

I'm not fond of ribbing either. In my early knitting days I did 2 jumpers totally in 1:1 ribbing - how I endured it, I can't say. Recently because I wanted a better way to rib, I investigated the Portuguese knitting method. As Tom says, ribbing in the PK method is very easy with minimal movements. Infortunately, I just couldn't get the hang of it but I recommend you give it a try. There are other respected knitters on here (like Tom, Jonathan and others) who use it exclusively with beautiful results. After my failure at PK, I did give combined (eastern uncrossed) knitting a go and found it very satisfactory for ribbing. I will definitely use it on my next pair of socks. The only caveat for me is that my guage is bigger when I knit this way so an adjustment of needle size will be in order.

Never trust a man who, when left alone in a room with a tea cozy, doesn't try it on.  ~Billy Connolly

Tom Hart's picture

Ribbing is a breeze with PK.

Ribbing is a breeze with PK. I double knit a lot and that is k1p1 throughout. Flipping back and forth between knit and purl position is just that: flipping, i.e., the left thumb flips the yarn back and forth between the knit and purl position.

AKQGuy's picture

I do continental... Maybe

I do continental... Maybe it's because I'm so fast that ribbing slows me down enough to be irritating? Yeah right. Did you catch the sarcasm?

Gregory Patrick's picture

Continental is the only way

Continental is the only way for me, man. I speed through stuff quickly. American is so slow in my hands. I'm going to have to google Portuguese.

I disliked ribbing when I

I disliked ribbing when I was only doing American style and having to bring the yarn forward for purl stitches and back again for knit stitches. Once I learned Continental style, I don't mind ribbing since it's easy to get into a rhythm. But I don't like to purl a whole row in Continental; for that I usually go back to throwing the yarn, i.e. American purl. But I always do knit stitches Continental. Someday I want to look into the Portuguese knitting that I've heard comment on.

Charles