Archive - Blog entry

November 8th, 2006

Crafty Andy's picture

Holidays 2006

Well I don't do much knitting, but I still knit. I have never done knitting on the round with a circular needle. I am making a hat and another scarf.

Lionbrand Homespun is not an easy to deal with yarn, but here I go. Thankls for looking

MMario's picture

Knitting at a Folk Music Gathering

For the past five years or so I've been attending an annual Folk Music weekend - lots of time to work on various knitting projects. Over the years more and more handcrafts are making their appearances at the various song workshops, concerts and sing-alongs; a bunch of knitters this year, several crocheters, some hand spinners, embroidery and this year even a quilter. Several comments heard at various times over the weekend:

wow! I can see knitting to shanties, but I never thought you could knit to Do-Wop!

Can somone loan me some needles and yarn? I feel out of place.

I knit Music into every stitch.

but best of all was when they tried to turn the lights down at once concert - got a chorus of "NO!"'s and then a shouted "We knitters have needles and we know how to use them!"

I managed to do the finishing on one shawl, added several inches in diameter to a circular shawl and got most of a christmas stocking knit up while listening and singing.

November 7th

grandcarriage's picture

the sash

Someone asked about the sash I knit for my highlander outfit. It is knit in Peruvian Tweed alpaca and Blue Moon mohair miniloop boucle (Olive garden is the color). Size 10.5 needles, K10, P10 rib for 90 stitches and 8 feet. (I think the whole thing cost about $70 for materials.) 1 skein each, lots of yardage on both. I still have enough yarn left to knit a scarf out of the same.

November 6th

Chris Vandenburg's picture

Hey Boys

Looking for a cool pattern for mittens, fingerless or not, to make as a xmas gift. I'm not liking much of what I am finding so far on the net.

Suggestions?

Oh... men's size med.

Hope you all are well!

Chris

altivo's picture

Two socks at once?

OK, guys, someone here probably has the answer or a pointer to it. I normally knit socks with DPs or using two circulars. I knit from the cuff down because I don't like the way heels come out on toe-up socks.

I know it is possible to knit both socks in the pair at once using various techniques. Double knitting, where you do one sock inside the other on either DPs or two circs or even one circ (not-so-magic loop method) has intellectual appeal like a magic trick but seems unnecessarily complex and risky. It seems to me that you should be able to just work two socks in parallel on the circulars, using two balls of yarn. Knit across half of one, change yarn and knit across the other. Lather, rinse, repeat. Might get a bit tricksy at the heel, I guess, but should still work.

Has anyone tried this? Or can you point to a tutorial on the web that shows it with drawings or photos? With or without that, I'm about to embark on the experiment I think. I know that no one ever notices if there's an extra row or two in the cuff or foot, but I know it's there and it bugs me. This should prevent that, and produce matching stripes in self-striping yarn too....

Gerard Allt's picture

thank you to those of you who have sent it blue squares

The river is quite massive now. Only a small % of the squares have been sew together. I can't wait til it's all finished and the squares are all sewn up!

November 5th

drmel94's picture

More Monmouth

All this talk about the Monmouth cap has had me reading up on it a bit and I got interested in some of the little details, especially after noticing in this example that there are some apparent increases/decreases in the hem to make the brim a bit wider and the brim where the hem turns is clearly more than just a simple purl row, though it's not clear if the hem was knit to the outer edge & the two sides cast off together or if there might be something else going on.

So I posted a query to the glb-knit listserv, primarily to see if Sarah Bradberry had any more to offer, but also to see if anyone else there might know more. Sarah suggests that the brim might be some sort of braided slip stitch turning row. She's also hinted that she's playing around with fulling, which was done with the original caps, and might have something about it in the rewrite of her hat book, which she's working on.

Gregory Patrick's picture

The Zen of Purling

I was caught knitting at work today, bored out of my mind, catching glances from customers and coworkers alike as I did my best to pass time. Someone finally asked how long I had been knitting and how I learned. Three years ago I passed a J. Crew window display with the most beautiful sweater I had ever seen, but was dmaned back to reality by the $300 price tag. I was first depressed that my financial situation was so crappy that I couldn't be worthy of having nice things. ("Quality and Expensive are neither the same nor better than one another," my grandmother used to say). Then I grew irritated and pissy that I couldn't have THAT sweater. That irritaton grew into an aggressive stomp to the nearest bookstore where I picked up a copy of "The Idiots Guide to Knitting." From there I went to Joann's and got myself on the mailing list and with each coupon I received, I'd purchase one skien of cashmere. Within 6 weeks I had that sweater, made myself and looking every bit better than the one in the window. The action of knitting is one that can lend you into an active contemplation, where the body and mind are quietly seperated into an almost meditative state. But, even more than this moment of frozen suspension of the world around me, I have found that I have learned tolerance (from patterns poorly written), patience (from mistakes made in haste), and the absolute art of self reliance.

grandcarriage's picture

Side to side sweater

Someone was asking about a side to side sweater. Here is a raglan one I did last winter in Plymouth Outback Mohair: A very good value~ 52" chest sweater in 4 skeins for a total cost of $45. It is very comfortable and light, not too warm, and was a very fast knit. I decided that I prefered it in reverse stockinette, although I have the same yarn in a different color and may do saddle shoulder side to side in regular stockinette, just to compare the finished results.
The decrease bands in "X's & O's" cable were knit separately and added afterwards. The collar and waist rib were added last. (I will probably take off the bottom rib and put on a rolled hem: I don't like the rib in mohair. The collar is doubled over on itself. Note how good the variegated yarn looks side to side: Kind of a rorschach test pattern. I get lots of compliments on this easy and quick sweater.

grandcarriage's picture

somewhat fancy

This was my senior studio thesis project for my BFA in 1990. It is a hand-doubleknit scarf, fully reversible as you can see. Some of the yarn was handspun by me: The fuzzy carmel colored one is Collie (leftovers from a commissioned sweater/blazer that I spun/designed/knit~ I can't find pictures of that creation, don't ask)

The scarf is NOT a tube, but a flat piece of fabric. Similar to double weave, but identical front and back, where as doubleweave is the reverse front to back...like a negative. It is approx 7 feet long and mainly wool, silk, collie, angora, with a little linen, mohair, and rayon thrown in. It has held up pretty well for 16 years of use (although I keep it for "special" as you can imagine).

PS: The collie yarn is fabulous: Incredibly soft and furry, doesn't shed...you just want to "roll around nekkid on it". The sweater/blazer was done for a collie breeder who wanted something to wear while showing his dogs in the cooler months: It was a shaped cardigan like a blazer with a shawl collar: Made in sock weight collie plied with a fine tussah silk. It was gorgeous, and he had it lined. I don't know how warm it was: It was done to his measurements, and