Archive - Mar 2007

March 15th

kiwiknitter's picture

The Complete Book of Traditional Fair Isle Knitting - Book

First published in 1981, this book by Sheila McGregor is considered a staple for stranded knitters. It is chockablock with charted Fair Isle patterns. Of course, there is the chapter on the history of FI knitting along with some B&W photos and a few colour ones. I like the sections on design, techniques and colour. Yup, she talks about steeks!

I recommend this book for the FI enthusiast - buy it while it's still available.

kiwiknitter's picture

Knit Fix - Book

Knit Fix - Problem Solving for Knitters by Lisa Kartus, 2006, has a spiral binding and hard cover with 111 pages.

The book has a brief introduction to knitting and then discusses problems that can arise in your projects. It has a problem/answer format. There are lots of good photos showing problems that a knitter may find in their work and the reasons for the error and solutions.

This book might be useful for someone who is an isolated knitter and has nowhere to go for assistance and advice. But, for the majority of knitters who can go to their LYS for help, this book is rather superfluous. The only section I thought of any value for me was the section on fixing incorrectly crossed cables by using a crochet hook. Since I've never been able to repair a cable by any of the methods using small knitting needles, I was intrigued by this technique.

Don't be fooled by the title - it's nothing extraordinary.

kiwiknitter's picture

Traditional Scandinavian Knitting - Book

This book is by Sheila McGregor and was published in 1984. My friend, Aaron (AMBush) kindly sent a copy to me. In addition to the history of Scandavian knitting, there are sections on Norwegian, Swedish and Danish, and North Atlantic Islands (Faeroe and Iceland) knitting styles. the book discusses techniques and styles. There are lots of charted patterns and black & white photos (not enough colour photos for my liking). As you might have guessed, I enjoyed reading about circular knitting, steeks and cut knitting along with seamless garments. There are also chapters discussing and giving patterns for jerseys, gloves and mittens, stockings and caps.

If you are interested in stranded knitting in Scandavian patterns, this is a great reference book. I recommend getting a copy while it is still available.

kiwiknitter's picture

Knitting Rules! - Book

This is a new book (2006) by the Yarn Harlot (Stephanie Pearl-McPhee). True to form, she writes in an entertaining manner and gets a lot of chuckles out of me. There are lots of fun and useful tips, peppered with funny comments. What I found the most useful was her section on beanies and how to do the pattern on your own "The No Pattern Hat". I have used the ideas in this chapter on multiple occasions and now I can successfully measure a person and knit a perfectly fitting hat for him/her.

This is a fun book and would make a good gift for your favourite knitter.

kiwiknitter's picture

Knitting Tips & Trade Secrets - Book

"Knitting Tips and Trade Secrets - expanded - Ingenious Techniques and Solutions for Hand and Machine Knitting and Crochet"; Pam Hoenig, editor; Taunton Press; 2006; 186 pages.

The book is a compilation of knitting tips sent in by US knitters. The chapters are:
Hand Knitting Techniques, Multicolor Knitting, Garment-Making Tips, Managing Your Knitting, Machine Knitting, Crochet Tips, Finishing and Caring for Your Project, Knitting Abbreviations.

I think this is an interesting book as knitting books go but I don't think I'd recommend running out and buying a copy straightaway. I couldn't sit and read it through but found I could only tolerate it in small doses. There are lots of good tips in it - some are very elementary and some are rather basic. I will admit to learning some new things but I don't think what I learned was worth the price of the book. The title is bit of a come-on.

kiwiknitter's picture

The Big Book of Knitting

This book has been discussed by a few members on MWK; I thought I'd get a copy to see what I thought of it. When I first looked through it I had 2 immediate impressions: 1) it looks European; and 2) it looks fantastic! It turns out both impressions are correct. It was originally published in German in 1996. I can't really describe why I think that this looks European rather than American; it just "feels" that way to me. Now, for why I think it's fantastic. This is unlike other knitting books I've seen. Yes, it has the basics that they all cover but this book goes beyond and gives multiple different methods for knitting techniques. I was so impressed by the fact that this book actually teaches a person to personalise the commercial pattern and to make alterations and changes for own's own taste. For example, this book covers multiple ways to do the neckline; I've never seen it covered like this in any other book (just this section made the purchase of the book very worthwhile for me).
This book is all about "professional" knitting. It was now taken it's place in my knitting library as my MVB (most valuable book) and would definitely have to join me on that desert island.

Chris Vandenburg's picture

Here It Comes Again

Hey Guys,

Quick update on my life as a few of you have asked. I've not been on or chatty lately as the house closes next Tuesday and I am frantically trying to get the remainder of the packing done. All the boxes are closing in around me and the disorganization is driving me crazy! All will be back to normal, ????, in a couple of weeks.

I have been knitting though. Working on a scarf for Jeff' mom in Louisa Harding Sari Ribbon (won't do that again), still working on the mindless 2x2 rib scarf for his dad and there is still the Debbie Bliss Sweater that will have its first birthday April 13. That was the day of conception.

Now, Justin, a great guy in my knitting group here in Dallas has suggested, and don't freak out, another knit-along this year. We haven't solidified a project yet so if you guys have any ideas we are open to them. To tell you a guy who sat here last Monday night knitting stocking net with a couple of beer bottles might just come up with a doozie on his own so suggest, suggest!!!

Hope all is going well with all of you around the world and I promise I shall be more social when all the dust settles.

Love y'all,

Chris

March 14th

Elemmaciltur's picture

Back with a blast (of sock yarns)

Howdy guys,

Been away to Cologne since last Thursday. I got back on Monday evening but haven't had the time to update. My sock yarns from the Wollmeise came in the day before I left for Cologne and so I had to race around to one of my friend to make yummy yarn cakes out of these beauties:

Wollmeise sock yarn

From left to right: Drachenblut, Amazonas, Iris Sibirica

They all turned into these:

Wollmeise yarn cakes

Okay, those are just the Drachenblut and Iris Sibirica...the Amazonas had already transformed over the trip to and back from Cologne:

Wollmeise yarn cake: knitted up

Started: 08th March 2007
Finished: WIP
Yarn: Rohrspatz & Wollmeise superwash sock yarn, 100% wool; colourway "Amazonas" (Amazon)
Needle: 2.5 mm/ US #1-2 Addi Turbos (using MagicLoop method)
Pattern: Universal Toe-up Sock using Magic Cast-On

Apart from that, I also got something from Cologne:

Trekking pro natura & Colinette's Jitterbug

Zitron's "Trekking pro natura" sock yarn: 75% New Wool, 25% Bamboo; colourway # 1640

Colinette's Jitterbug sock yarn, 100% superwash Merino; colourway #67 "Copperbeach"

I actually bought just the Jitterbug. Thing was, I went to MaschenKunst, a LYS in Cologne owned by Daniela Johansonova, the maker and voice of the Secret Knitting Podcast! I got the Trekking pro natura kind of for free. "Kind of" because I am to test-knit it for her..but still: *woot!* How cool is that?

You can go and read about my adventures in Cologne and see more photos on my Blog.

MMario's picture

ONline shopping - benefit or curse?.

way too much stuff available too easily - I'm currently trying to resist

*the kilo cone of mohair silk blend that cost about 1/4 of what it would come to in individual skeins;

*the Icelandic book "Three cornered and long shawls";

*Addi Turbo's in several sizes; (I need them, I do, I do, I do!)

*a swift

I did give in and bu a reprint of Sarah Don's 'The Art of Shetland Lace'

March 13th

ann g's picture

new in town

OK, I'm new on this site. I'm not an advanced knitter as most of you are. And to top it all, I'm a woman. Still, I do have a couple of existential bugs for you guys, so I hope you'll condescend to answer my humble questions ;-)
- about blocking: do I block only once, before putting all the pieces together or do I need to do this each time after washing the project (until know I've always lost interest somewhere half the project so I never had to deal with this one)
- when knitting with double thread, do you guys roll the skein with double thread beforehand or do you knit with 2 balls at once (no pun intended)

Anyway, love the site and the useful comments but above all the nice (and funny) things with which you support one another! I'll keep on reading the posts, even if you think I'm not physically equipped to entry myself ;-)